The Clones' Yowl

or those pondering the cloning of their favorite feline should do a little research.

By | November 22, 2004

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Anyone curious about cloned kittens1 or those pondering the cloning of their favorite feline should do a little research. They would then realize that cloning does more harm than good.

The Roslin Institute, where Dolly the sheep was cloned and died prematurely, took a position against pet cloning primarily because of welfare concerns for the animals who are used to harvest eggs and bear offspring, as well as the cloned animals who are born.2

Published scientific articles indicate that the tiny percentage of cloned animals who actually survive birth may be deformed and suffer in a myriad of ways, many of which are likely unknown, as this technology is so new. CC, the first cat to be cloned, is still young.

Put simply, this service exists not to advance human or veterinary medicine but to profit from a new and highly inefficient technology, which targets wealthy eccentrics and exploits people who cannot bear the thought of living without a beloved companion animal. I urge anyone who would consider cloning a companion animal to instead visit a local shelter or search http://www.petfinder.org.

Crystal Miller-SpiegelAmerican Anti-Vivisection Society Jenkintown, Pa. cspiegel@aavs.org

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