Advertisement
Bethyl Laboratories
Bethyl Laboratories

Faculty of 1000 | Interdisciplinary Research

These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature-awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.R. Ando et al., "Regulated fast nucleocytoplasmic shuttling observed by reversible protein highlighting," Science, 306:1370-3, Nov. 19, 2004.The authors describe a new fluorophore (Dronpa) that has a high quantum yield as well as being remarkably photochromic. Dronpa can be interconverted between bright (fluorescent) and dark (nonfluorescent) states by

January 17, 2005

<p/>

These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature-awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.

R. Ando et al., "Regulated fast nucleocytoplasmic shuttling observed by reversible protein highlighting," Science, 306:1370-3, Nov. 19, 2004.

The authors describe a new fluorophore (Dronpa) that has a high quantum yield as well as being remarkably photochromic. Dronpa can be interconverted between bright (fluorescent) and dark (nonfluorescent) states by light of different wavelengths and so can be highlighted, erased, and highlighted again in a nondestructive manner in living cells.

- Murray StewartMedical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK

J.S. Weinger et al., "Substrate-assisted catalysis of peptide bond formation by the ribosome." Nat Struct Mol Biol, 11:1101-6, Nov. 11, 2004.

Although high-resolution structures of bacterial ribosomes have been available for four years, the mechanism of peptide bond formation remains elusive. In this paper, the authors find that the 2'OH of nucleotide A76 within the 3' CCA end of a tRNA plays an essential role in peptide bond formation. The evolutionarily archaic nature of such a substrate-assisted catalysis lends further support to the idea that prebiotic catalytic strategies are still functioning.

- Reinhard LührmannMax-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Germany

M.N. Poy et al., "A pancreatic islet-specific microRNA regulates insulin secretion." Nature, 432:226-30, Nov. 11, 2004.

One of the first functional characterizations of a mammalian microRNA: miR-375 appears to inhibit insulin secretion by targeting the myotrophin mRNA. Overexpression and inhibition of mir-375 have clear physiological effects, so this is the first physiologically validated microRNA/target combination in mammals, with plausibly a single target site in the myotrophin mRNA.

- Chris SanderMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York

Advertisement

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement
Anova
Anova

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Eppendorf
Eppendorf
Advertisement