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HELP WITH HAZARDOUS WASTE

HELP WITH HAZARDOUS WASTE Author: Caren D. Potter Scientists and lab directors say that there are many ways to cut down on hazardous waste. These include the following measures: * Substitute a safe chemical for one that is hazardous. Non- hazardous degreasers have been developed to replace xylene, for example. * If a safe alternative is not available, a less-hazardous chemical, such as toluene, can sometimes be used in place of a very hazardous one, such as benzene. * Practice mi

By | April 19, 1993



HELP WITH HAZARDOUS WASTE

Author: Caren D. Potter

Scientists and lab directors say that there are many ways to cut down on hazardous waste. These include the following measures: * Substitute a safe chemical for one that is hazardous. Non- hazardous degreasers have been developed to replace xylene, for example. * If a safe alternative is not available, a less-hazardous chemical, such as toluene, can sometimes be used in place of a very hazardous one, such as benzene. * Practice microscale laboratory techniques whenever possible. * Purchase analytical instruments that are sensitive to small volumes. * Segregate hazardous materials and label with care. In some places, unlabeled materials must be treated as hazardous waste. Mixed waste requires the more costly disposal route. * Use secondary containment procedures--dishpan under bottles of chemicals; seismic braces on shelves. Spilled chemicals must be treated as hazardous waste in many places. * Share surplus materials. A central stockroom and an up-to-date hazardous materials inventory are key ingredients in this effort. * Buy only in volumes you need. Initial purchase savings on large quantities are often offset by disposal costs. * Review current practices and revise where possible. For example, establish detergent and hot water as the routine glassware cleaning materials and use chromic acid only when absolutely necessary.

--C.D.P.

TI : HELP WITH HAZARDOUS WASTE

TY : TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY

Below is a sampler of resource organizations for labs that work with hazardous waste:

BLACK RHINO RECYCLING INC./FRESH CHEMCO P.O. Box 18044 Pittsburgh, Pa. 15236 (800) 633-6030 Fax: (412) 655-4034

CANADIAN CENTRE FOR OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY 250 Main St., E. Hamilton, Ontario L8N 1H6 (416) 572-2981 Fax: (416) 572-2206

CENTER FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS RESEARCH (CHMR) 320 William Pitt Way U. of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center Pittsburgh, Pa. 15238 (412) 826-5320 Fax: (412) 826-5552

CHEMICAL SAFETY 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 180 Richmond, Calif. 94804 (510) 231-9490 Fax: (510) 231-9520

CHEMICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT INC. (subsidiary of Waste Management Inc.) 3003 Butterfield Rd. Oak Brook, Ill. 60521 (708) 218-1500 Fax: (708) 572-3094

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 500 C St., S.W. Washington, D.C. 20472 (202) 646-4600

ROLLINS ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 2349 Wilmington, Del. 19899 (302) 426-2700 Fax: (302) 426-3873

SAFETY KLEEN CORP. 777 Big Timber Rd. Elgin, Ill. 60123 (800) 323-5040 (708)697-2783

(See also the Hazardous Waste Disposal Productsand Services Directory on page 31.)

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