Brian Duling

BRIAN DULING, Robert M. Berne Professor of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics and director, Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville "The Scientist discusses the spectrum of political and social events in a way that keeps members of the scientific community ." Brian Duling, past president of the American Physiological Society, studies the regulation of vascular transport of oxygen to tissue. His ground-breaking work identified oxygen-diffusion patterns

October 2, 1995

BRIAN DULING, Robert M. Berne Professor of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics and director, Cardiovascular Research Center,
University of Virginia, Charlottesville

"The Scientist discusses the spectrum of political and social events in a way that keeps members of the scientific community ."

Brian Duling, past president of the American Physiological Society, studies the regulation of vascular transport of oxygen to tissue. His ground-breaking work identified oxygen-diffusion patterns in microcirculation as well as electrical communication mechanisms in vessel walls. He has received numerous prestigious awards, including the Landis Award from the American Microcirculatory Society.

Outside of his research, Duling's chief concern is the future of science. He notes, "The vitality of the scientific enterprise depends on the collaboration of mature, experienced minds and young minds ready to ask questions. This country acutely needs young people entering science. We have to create an environment that makes them look to science both as an exciting avocation and a profession."

As a reader of The Scientist, Duling says: "For science to flourish, scientists must continue to extend their understanding beyond their own specialties. The Scientist discusses the spectrum of political and social events in a way that keeps members of the scientific community informed about the context of their work."

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(The Scientist, Vol:9, #19, pg.9 , October 2, 1995)
(Copyright © The Scientist, Inc.)

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