Stem cells branch out

Differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are originally totipotent, puts increasing restrictions on the final fates that a cell can achieve. This simple idea was upset last year when neural stem cells were shown to produce blood cells in irradiated adult mice. In the 2 June issue of Science, Clarke et al. show that neural stem cells injected into embryos can generate a wide variety of tissues including cells in the central nervous system, heart, liver, and intestine (Science 2000, 288

By | June 7, 2000

Differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are originally totipotent, puts increasing restrictions on the final fates that a cell can achieve. This simple idea was upset last year when neural stem cells were shown to produce blood cells in irradiated adult mice. In the 2 June issue of Science, Clarke et al. show that neural stem cells injected into embryos can generate a wide variety of tissues including cells in the central nervous system, heart, liver, and intestine (Science 2000, 288:1660-1663). This raises the possibility of using similar stem cells for human therapy, in place of the ethically questionable use of human ES cells.

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  3. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  4. Government Nixes Teaching Evolution in Turkish Schools
AAAS