DCIS and Mammography

NEW YORK, June 19 (Praxis Press) Most women accept that a false positive result can occur with screening mammography. Few, however, have heard of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a potentially non-progressive cancer also detected by screening mammography. Schwartz and colleagues surveyed 479 women, aged 18-97 years, without a history of breast cancer (see paper). They found that women are aware of the possibility of false positive results and view them as an acceptab

June 19, 2000

NEW YORK, June 19 (Praxis Press) Most women accept that a false positive result can occur with screening mammography. Few, however, have heard of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a potentially non-progressive cancer also detected by screening mammography. Schwartz and colleagues surveyed 479 women, aged 18-97 years, without a history of breast cancer (see paper). They found that women are aware of the possibility of false positive results and view them as an acceptable consequence of screening mammography. In contrast, very few women knew that screening could detect cancers, such as DCIS, that may never progress. The women felt that such information would be relevant to them, however. Women should be informed about the possible detection of DCIS when undergoing mammography.

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