Thrombosis treatment

NEW YORK, June 27 (Praxis Press) Heparins have been shown to be effective and safe in the treatment of deep vein thrombosis, but the use of this treatment on an outpatient versus an inpatient basis has not been compared. To compare the two treatment locales, Boccalon and colleagues conducted a randomized, comparative, multicenter trial and evaluated the clinical outcomes and treatment costs (see paper). The researchers examined 201 patients with proximal deep vein thrombosis and administered low

June 27, 2000

NEW YORK, June 27 (Praxis Press) Heparins have been shown to be effective and safe in the treatment of deep vein thrombosis, but the use of this treatment on an outpatient versus an inpatient basis has not been compared. To compare the two treatment locales, Boccalon and colleagues conducted a randomized, comparative, multicenter trial and evaluated the clinical outcomes and treatment costs (see paper). The researchers examined 201 patients with proximal deep vein thrombosis and administered low-molecular-weight heparin at the registered dose followed by an oral anticoagulant for up to 6 months, either in the hospital for the first 10 days followed by treatment at home (n=102) or at home from the outset (n=99). No differences in clinical outcome were detectable between the two groups. For most patients with proximal deep vein thrombosis, home treatment using a low-molecular-weight heparin is safe and effective.

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS