Drawing blood

New York, July 5, 2000 (Praxis Press) Blood glucose testing, one of the most commonly performed procedures in clinical practice, traditionally uses lancet sampling drawn from a finger, a procedure experienced as painful by patients. Previous studies suggest the side of the thumb as a less painful site. In an open, prospective randomized trial published by the British Journal of Medicine (see paper), sampling from the earlobe, an equally accessible and vascular site, resulted in a less painful

July 6, 2000

New York, July 5, 2000 (Praxis Press) Blood glucose testing, one of the most commonly performed procedures in clinical practice, traditionally uses lancet sampling drawn from a finger, a procedure experienced as painful by patients. Previous studies suggest the side of the thumb as a less painful site. In an open, prospective randomized trial published by the British Journal of Medicine (see paper), sampling from the earlobe, an equally accessible and vascular site, resulted in a less painful procedure. The study suggests that patients may prefer lancet puncture of the earlobe for random blood glucose tests. Consider offering this option to your patients.

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