Cholesterol after CABG

New York, July 5, 2000 (Praxis Press) Studies show that a reduction in risk factors following coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) improves patients' prognosis. Such patient management was suboptimal in Britain before the publication of landmark trials demonstrating the benefit of cholesterol reduction. In a 10-year audit of secondary prevention in CABG patients, Irving et al show that despite significantly improved management of well-established risk factors, including cholesterol concentratio

July 6, 2000

New York, July 5, 2000 (Praxis Press) Studies show that a reduction in risk factors following coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) improves patients' prognosis. Such patient management was suboptimal in Britain before the publication of landmark trials demonstrating the benefit of cholesterol reduction. In a 10-year audit of secondary prevention in CABG patients, Irving et al show that despite significantly improved management of well-established risk factors, including cholesterol concentration, 48% of patients are not receiving appropriate cholesterol-lowering treatment (see paper). Patients who underwent a bypass surgery before 1994 are the least likely to receive a cholesterol-management program. It is important to note, though, that the study does not include data on patient compliance. These findings suggest that secondary prevention in CABG patients should stress cholesterol-management programs.

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