Toxoplasmosis in pregnancy, and meat

NEW YORK, July 17 (Praxis Press) Maternal toxoplasmosis can have devastating consequences for the baby; however, the main risk factors associated with this infection have not been well defined. In a European case-control study, Cook and colleagues evaluated the role of food and environmental factors in acute toxoplasmosis among pregnant women (see paper). Eating undercooked and cured meat accounted for 30% to 63% of infections at the six study centers; other significant risk factors included soi

July 21, 2000

NEW YORK, July 17 (Praxis Press) Maternal toxoplasmosis can have devastating consequences for the baby; however, the main risk factors associated with this infection have not been well defined. In a European case-control study, Cook and colleagues evaluated the role of food and environmental factors in acute toxoplasmosis among pregnant women (see paper). Eating undercooked and cured meat accounted for 30% to 63% of infections at the six study centers; other significant risk factors included soil contact, and travel outside Europe, the United States, and Canada. Women should be routinely advised about toxoplasmosis risk factors and cautioned not to eat undercooked or cured meat during pregnancy.

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