Breeding a better vector

DNA shuffling (also called molecular breeding) generates variation by random fragmentation of a cloned gene followed by reassembly of the fragments in a self-priming polymerase reaction. The result is a recombination of overlapping fragments that have different mutations or come from different, naturally occurring homologous genes. In the August Nature Genetics Soong et al apply this technique to a pool of six different murine leukemia virus envelope sequences to derive a new virus that can,

By | August 7, 2000

DNA shuffling (also called molecular breeding) generates variation by random fragmentation of a cloned gene followed by reassembly of the fragments in a self-priming polymerase reaction. The result is a recombination of overlapping fragments that have different mutations or come from different, naturally occurring homologous genes. In the August Nature Genetics Soong et al apply this technique to a pool of six different murine leukemia virus envelope sequences to derive a new virus that can, unlike its parents, infect Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHOK1) cells (Nat. Gen. 2000, 25:436-439). Similar selections on clinically relevant cell types may yield improved vectors for gene therapy.

Popular Now

  1. Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice
  2. Superbug Resistant to Every Antibiotic in the U.S. Killed Nevada Woman
  3. Next Generation: Mobile Microscope Detects DNA Sequences
  4. Tenure Under Attack in Two More States
    The Nutshell Tenure Under Attack in Two More States

    Proposed legislation would eliminate academic tenure at public universities in Iowa and Missouri, echoing a move that has already gutted such permanent posts in Wisconsin.

RayBiotech