Corticosteroids and asthma death

NEW YORK, August 3 (Praxis Press) Inhaled corticosteroids are effective in treating asthma but it is unclear whether their use can prevent death from asthma. Suissa and colleagues performed a population-based study of deaths from asthma in Saskatchewan, Canada, between 1975 and 1991, and found that regular use of inhaled corticosteroids might be associated with a decreased risk of death from asthma. Out of 30,569 subjects, 66 patients who died of asthma and who had complete records inhaled a mea

August 8, 2000

NEW YORK, August 3 (Praxis Press) Inhaled corticosteroids are effective in treating asthma but it is unclear whether their use can prevent death from asthma. Suissa and colleagues performed a population-based study of deaths from asthma in Saskatchewan, Canada, between 1975 and 1991, and found that regular use of inhaled corticosteroids might be associated with a decreased risk of death from asthma. Out of 30,569 subjects, 66 patients who died of asthma and who had complete records inhaled a mean number of 1.18 canisters of corticosteroids compared with a mean number of 1.57 canisters for the controls. They also found that the rate of death from asthma decreased by 21% with each additional canister of inhaled corticosteroids used in the previous year. The regular use of low-dose inhaled corticosteroids may decrease the risk of death from asthma.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. The Mycobiome
    Features The Mycobiome

    The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

  2. Antibody Alternatives
    Features Antibody Alternatives

    Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

  3. Holding Their Ground
    Features Holding Their Ground

    To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

  4. Circadian Clock and Aging
    Daily News Circadian Clock and Aging

    Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies