Advertisement
LabX
LabX

Can't get there from here

In the 10 August Nature, Burch and Chao find that two populations of an RNA virus, derived from a single ancestral phage, repeatedly evolve towards different fitness maxima (Nature 2000, 406:625-628). The average fitness of one of the final phage populations is actually lower than that of the starting clone, suggesting that the original individual was at the peak of a local maximum of fitness. The existence of these different and non-overlapping solutions to maximizing fitness suggests that the

By | August 15, 2000

In the 10 August Nature, Burch and Chao find that two populations of an RNA virus, derived from a single ancestral phage, repeatedly evolve towards different fitness maxima (Nature 2000, 406:625-628). The average fitness of one of the final phage populations is actually lower than that of the starting clone, suggesting that the original individual was at the peak of a local maximum of fitness. The existence of these different and non-overlapping solutions to maximizing fitness suggests that the evolvability of an RNA virus is determined by which advantageous genotypes are within its mutational neighborhood.

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. LabQuiz: What's Your Cell IQ?
    Sponsored Quiz LabQuiz: What's Your Cell IQ?

    Your body is made up of trillions of cells—but what do you really know about them? Take our lab quiz and determine your CIQ (cell identification quotient). 

  2. Immune Defect Detected in Knockout Mice
  3. Antibiotics From Scratch
  4. Antibody Maker Loses License Over Animal Welfare Violations
Advertisement
Advertisement
Biosearch Technologies
illumina Corporate
illumina Corporate