Preventing artery damage during angioplasty

Balloon catheters could be coated with ceramide to prevent damage to arteries.

By | August 21, 2000

LONDON, August 21 (SPIS MedWire) A 'ceramide' coating on balloon catheters used during angioplasty could prevent the reblocking of arteries in the majority of cases. The ceramide membrane prevents arteries being damaged when the probe is inserted, and therefore reduces the laying down of new tissue, which happens in about 40% of angioplasties. Researchers from Penn State University, USA, found that the risk of subsequent blockages was reduced by more than 90%. Mark Kester, leader of the study, suggested the possibility of further potential benefits: "Patients who suffer from kidney diseases and need dialysis must be connected to dialysis machines through functional arteries and veins. The access ports often become clogged or restricted. We think the ceramide treatment could help those patients as well."

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