Malaria's dangerous neighborhood

The var genes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum encode the major variable parasite protein and are expressed in a mutually exclusive manner at the surface of an infected red blood cell. In the 26 October Nature, Freitas-Junior et al. report that Plasmodium uses nuclear architecture in a pathogen survival strategy (Nature 2000, 407:1018-1022). The sub-telomeric regions that contain the var genes are clustered together at the nuclear periphery, apparently allowing recombination at freq

By | October 31, 2000

The var genes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum encode the major variable parasite protein and are expressed in a mutually exclusive manner at the surface of an infected red blood cell. In the 26 October Nature, Freitas-Junior et al. report that Plasmodium uses nuclear architecture in a pathogen survival strategy (Nature 2000, 407:1018-1022). The sub-telomeric regions that contain the var genes are clustered together at the nuclear periphery, apparently allowing recombination at frequencies much higher than those expected from homologous crossover events alone.

Popular Now

  1. National Academies Detail the State of Weed Science
  2. Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice
  3. Neural Mechanism Links Alcohol Consumption to Binge Eating
  4. Image of the Day: Monkey Business
    Image of the Day Image of the Day: Monkey Business

    For the first time, researchers have documented interspecies sexual behavior between a male Japanese macaque and a female sika deer.

RayBiotech