Keeping up the weight loss

Just in time for the New Year's resolution. A randomised, double blind trial suggests that the drug, sibutramine, previously known for inducing dose-dependent weight loss and enhancing the effects of a low-calorie diets, is effective in sustaining weight loss (Lancet 2000; 356: 2119-25). The international team of researchers, lead by Professor W Philip T James from Aberdeen, UK, studied 605 obese patients recruited from eight European centres. The patients were enrolled in a 6-month period of we

By | December 29, 2000

Just in time for the New Year's resolution. A randomised, double blind trial suggests that the drug, sibutramine, previously known for inducing dose-dependent weight loss and enhancing the effects of a low-calorie diets, is effective in sustaining weight loss (Lancet 2000; 356: 2119-25).

The international team of researchers, lead by Professor W Philip T James from Aberdeen, UK, studied 605 obese patients recruited from eight European centres. The patients were enrolled in a 6-month period of weight loss treatment with sibutramine (10 mg/day) and an individualised dietary programme; 467 (77%) achieved more than 5% weight loss and were eligible for the second phase of the trial where they were randomly assigned either 10 mg/day of sibutramine (352 patients) or placebo (115 patients) for a further 18 months. Of the 204 sibutramine-treated patients who completed the trial, 89 (43%) maintained 80% or more of their original weight loss, compared with only nine (16%) of the 57 individuals receiving placebo.

Now the bad news; HDL-cholesterol concentrations (beneficial in protecting against heart disease) were greater in the sibutramine group (20.7% compared with 11.7%) and researchers were forced to withdraw 20 (3%) patients because of increases in blood pressure. Professor James says that patients receiving this drug should have their blood pressure monitored regularly to identify any unusual cardiovascular effects.

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  2. AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation
  3. Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness
  4. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews
Advertisement
The Scientist