Fluoroquinolones may reduce the risk of myocardial infarction

Antibiotic treatment for infections of Chlamydia pneumoniae has been associated with protection against myocardial infarction, probably via a stabilizing effect on the cytoskeleton of endothelial cells and on chondrocytes in humans. Dr Herings et al from the Netherlands decided to test this association through a case-control study to see whether patients receiving antibiotics for Chlamydia pneumoniae infections were less likely to have been admitted for a first acute MI (JAMA 2000 284:2998-2999)

By | January 3, 2001

Antibiotic treatment for infections of Chlamydia pneumoniae has been associated with protection against myocardial infarction, probably via a stabilizing effect on the cytoskeleton of endothelial cells and on chondrocytes in humans. Dr Herings et al from the Netherlands decided to test this association through a case-control study to see whether patients receiving antibiotics for Chlamydia pneumoniae infections were less likely to have been admitted for a first acute MI (JAMA 2000 284:2998-2999).

They identified 628 patients, aged 35 to 75, admitted with a first hospitalization for MI, studied their drug history, and compared them to 1615 matched controls. Only intake of high doses of fluoroquinolones was significantly associated with a lower risk of acute myocardial infarction. For those who took more than one course of fluoroquinolones, the odds ratio was 0.12 (95% CI, 0.02-0.94). For all other antibiotics, in particular tetracyclines and macrolides, no significant association was observed.

The authors hypothesize the negative association of fluoroquinolones with MI may be mediated via their nonbacterial inhibitory actions, which may prevent calcification in the later stages of plaque formation.

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