Cycling surprises

Array analysis of dividing cells has been tackled for yeast, but in the January Nature Genetics Cho et al. present the first large-scale analysis in human cells (Nat Genet 2001, 27:48-54). They identify 731 of 40,000 human genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) as being cell cycle regulated in primary fibroblasts, and use a functional classification system to identify coordinate regulation of pathways.

By | January 5, 2001

Array analysis of dividing cells has been tackled for yeast, but in the January Nature Genetics Cho et al. present the first large-scale analysis in human cells (Nat Genet 2001, 27:48-54). They identify 731 of 40,000 human genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) as being cell cycle regulated in primary fibroblasts, and use a functional classification system to identify coordinate regulation of pathways. Notable surprises include upregulation of motility-related genes in G2 (perhaps to prepare daughter cells for migration away from each other), and of extracellular matrix-associated genes in M (possibly to enhance the re-establishment of cell-cell contact and communication after mitosis).

Popular Now

  1. Top 10 Innovations 2016
    Features Top 10 Innovations 2016

    This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

  2. Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease
  3. Pubic Hair Grooming Linked to STI Risk
    The Nutshell Pubic Hair Grooming Linked to STI Risk

    Observational study suggests pubic hair grooming correlates with heightened risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections, although causation remains unclear.

  4. Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue
Rockland