Cloning big sheep

Cloning and in vitro culture of sheep embryos have been associated with bigger livestock and 'large offspring syndrome' (LOS). In the February Nature Genetics Young et al. provide a molecular explanation for the observed fetal overgrowth (Nat Genet 2001, 27:153-154). They developed a culture system that consistently results in large offspring (LO) in 25% of births. Young et al. measured the levels of several imprinted genes that are associated with fetal overgrowth syndromes in man. The levels o

By | February 21, 2001

Cloning and in vitro culture of sheep embryos have been associated with bigger livestock and 'large offspring syndrome' (LOS). In the February Nature Genetics Young et al. provide a molecular explanation for the observed fetal overgrowth (Nat Genet 2001, 27:153-154). They developed a culture system that consistently results in large offspring (LO) in 25% of births. Young et al. measured the levels of several imprinted genes that are associated with fetal overgrowth syndromes in man. The levels of IGFR2 mRNA were reduced by 30-60% in LO embryos and protein levels were diminished by as much as 60-80%. Reduced IGF2R expression was associated with loss of methylation of the differentially methylated region from the second intron of the ovine IGF2R gene. These results suggest an epigenetic mechanism for the LOS overgrowth phenotype.

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech