Cloning ban to stay down under?

Australian stem cell researchers got some bad news today when newspapers reported that senior ministers in the national government are going to ignore the linkurl:advice;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/23355/ of an independent review that had recommended somatic cell nuclear transfer be permitted for research. That might have been the advice, but at a Cabinet meeting today ministers are expected to retain the status quo. Two of the main figures behind the decision are health minister

By | June 19, 2006

Australian stem cell researchers got some bad news today when newspapers reported that senior ministers in the national government are going to ignore the linkurl:advice;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/23355/ of an independent review that had recommended somatic cell nuclear transfer be permitted for research. That might have been the advice, but at a Cabinet meeting today ministers are expected to retain the status quo. Two of the main figures behind the decision are health minister Tony Abbott and treasurer Peter Costello. Meanwhile, the national minister responsible for science, Julie Bishop is apparently overseas and will not be attending today's meeting. Surely I'm not the only one who finds this remarkable? Anyway, the decision of the Cabinet will be discussed next month at a meeting of the national and state governments. No doubt there will be some fiery words in that forum from leaders of the states of Queensland and Victoria--both of whom are strong supporters of the technology.

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Avatar of: Tom

Tom

Posts: 1

June 20, 2006

Thank you for your committment to explaining interesting and important scientific discoveries online, and combatting the war on science. I've just recently started a new project with similar goals called The Scientific Method at http://thenewphenomenology.blogspot.com/. I am a biology graduate student trying to spread common knowledge and news of discovery from the scientific community to the public at large, so that people may become more informed decision makers and citizens. Check out my blog and keep up the good work!

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