More food + no exercise = weight gain. Really?

From an Endocrine Society linkurl:press release;http://sev.prnewswire.com/health-care-hospitals/20060627/NYTU00827062006-1.html describing a study presented at their national conference this week: 'Our preliminary results indicate that body weight is compromised and weight goes up when people are exposed to an environment with unlimited availability of palatable food and low levels of daily activity,' said University of Chicago researcher Plamen Penev. Stop the presses!

By | June 28, 2006

From an Endocrine Society linkurl:press release;http://sev.prnewswire.com/health-care-hospitals/20060627/NYTU00827062006-1.html describing a study presented at their national conference this week: 'Our preliminary results indicate that body weight is compromised and weight goes up when people are exposed to an environment with unlimited availability of palatable food and low levels of daily activity,' said University of Chicago researcher Plamen Penev. Stop the presses! Read further, and you realize that what Penev was actually trying to study was whether disturbed sleep has an effect on insulin resistance. That may actually be important. So aside from the fact that this environment seems to describe the US, did we really need that quote?

Comments

July 17, 2006

I believe emotional unrest, unable to satisfy your emotional energies remember not love or for want of something but a lack of some satisfaction increases increased intake of high calorie food. It is this stress that triggers also lack of activity that increases weight.
Avatar of: sempersanus

sempersanus

Posts: 1

August 27, 2006

After I read the press release and Mr. Oranski's Blog entry, I was left with the impression that Mr. Oranski is trying to stir some controversy in a strange fashion.\n\n Do we need the selected quote? If you take it out of context, it seems that Dr. Penev was stating the obvious. On the other hand, with limited number of subjects in a relatively short study, it seems important to stress that the participants responded in the expected manner, before introducing the variable of interest - sleep deprivation. If you take this angle and use the whole statement, the answer is resounding "yes". In summary, the study confirms that the regulation of body mass is erratic under the specified conditions, and adds that the error is exacerbated by sleep deprivation.\nIs Oranski's comment appropriate? Hardly.\n

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