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Cloning in Iran

Iranian biosciences aren?t exactly top of the news agenda these days, so I was interested to linkurl:read;http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/research/story/0,,1839217,00.html this week that researchers at Tehran?s linkurl:Royan Institute;http://www.royaninstitute.org/ have "succeeded" in producing what is apparently the Middle East's first cloned sheep. The sheep died minutes after it was delivered at the institute, which specializes in fertility issues (Royan meaning Embryo in

By | August 11, 2006

Iranian biosciences aren?t exactly top of the news agenda these days, so I was interested to linkurl:read;http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/research/story/0,,1839217,00.html this week that researchers at Tehran?s linkurl:Royan Institute;http://www.royaninstitute.org/ have "succeeded" in producing what is apparently the Middle East's first cloned sheep. The sheep died minutes after it was delivered at the institute, which specializes in fertility issues (Royan meaning Embryo in Persian). Still, it was hailed as a landmark achievement after months of unsuccessful cloning attempts also involving cows and mice. Iran's cloning program reportedly has the blessing of the country's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, as is its research into embryonic stem cells, which has been going on since 2002. In the __Guardian__ article I read, Reza Samani, the Royan Institute's public affairs officer, said: "We are not yet satisfied with our efforts. We will continue until we produce a clone that survives. We tried with a cow and the process was almost successful, but the gestation was so long that the mother miscarried. Work with the sheep is at a more advanced level." Meanwhile, the article prompted me to look up the center?s website. On it I read that its scientists have this year published five papers in Iranian journals and 13 in international journals. They?ve presented 8 papers at local conferences, and 21 on the international stage. A quick glance through some of their completed projects also made interesting reading?differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts, linkurl:cardiac;http://www.the-scientist.com/2006/8/1/34/1/ transplant of autologous cells and the culture of limbal stem cells in vitro, and their transplant into burned cornea, and so on. OK, so maybe none of those projects are particularly earth shattering, but in the midst of everything that?s going on these days, somehow reading all this on the institute?s website cheered me up immensely.
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Comments

Avatar of: rashid

rashid

Posts: 1

August 11, 2006

this is a silly typical accusation that you throw against some who you want to discredit (due to envy, or whatever). \nthe Ayatollah is religious leader many people can go and seek advice from not someone involved in politics.\n
Avatar of: hass

hass

Posts: 1

August 11, 2006

I understand that Iran has already introduced a genetically-modified variety of rice, and has been working on cloning the rare Persian Cheetah in cooperation with India.\n\nI suppose these stories are interesting because Westerners assume that a religious country/society must necessarily be opposed to modern science, but that's not the case.

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Mettler Toledo
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences