Walsh discloses conflicts -- five years later

In December, I linkurl:wrote about the fact;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/39136/ that NIH researcher Thomas Walsh, who has faced scrutiny over funding he has received and failed to disclose from drug companies, had apparently failed to disclose conflicts of interest in a paper published in the January 1, 2007 Clinical Infectious Diseases. Now, it seems, journal editors are starting to catch up with stories reporting Walsh's conflicts. In the New England Journal of Medicine that lande

By | February 14, 2007

In December, I linkurl:wrote about the fact;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/39136/ that NIH researcher Thomas Walsh, who has faced scrutiny over funding he has received and failed to disclose from drug companies, had apparently failed to disclose conflicts of interest in a paper published in the January 1, 2007 Clinical Infectious Diseases. Now, it seems, journal editors are starting to catch up with stories reporting Walsh's conflicts. In the New England Journal of Medicine that landed in my mailbox today, there's a correction on page 760. It refers to a study published on January 24, 2002. ''The following line should be included afer the paragraph describing study support (page 233): 'Dr. Walsh reports receiving consulting fees from Pfizer in 2001.'' A note about the correction appears in a link to the linkurl:original paper;http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/346/4/225 . I'm of course curious what prompted this disclosure five years after the fact, but I'd also like to know if other belated disclosures will follow. If you see any, please post them here.

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