Cloning and Paperwork

Ian Wilmut talks about his disappointment in the failure to move forward on human stem cell research involving cloned embryos in today's Hartford Courant. linkurl:Read it here;http://www.courant.com/news/health/hc-ctdolly0328.artmar28,0,4944106.story?coll=hc-headlines-health Obviously the challenges are many, but to blame his failure to receive a license for cloning human embryos on getting behind in the paperwork does seem a bit odd. Wilmut had written for us when he was first applying said

By | March 28, 2007

Ian Wilmut talks about his disappointment in the failure to move forward on human stem cell research involving cloned embryos in today's Hartford Courant. linkurl:Read it here;http://www.courant.com/news/health/hc-ctdolly0328.artmar28,0,4944106.story?coll=hc-headlines-health Obviously the challenges are many, but to blame his failure to receive a license for cloning human embryos on getting behind in the paperwork does seem a bit odd. Wilmut had written for us when he was first applying said license. Read his linkurl:case for cloning here.;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/15421/ I hope our web experiment on generating discussion for stem cell cloning, which appeared on our website yesterday linkurl:(read about it here),;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/home/53034/ will provide some good questions to pose about the best scientific approach. Obviously reprogramming an adult cell directly (mentioned heavily in the Courant article) is an attractive choice, but it would seem that much of what we need to know about reprogramming the nucleus will have to come from actually observing the nuclear reprogramming that takes place during somatic cell nuclear transfer. Take part in the discussion and help us shape our June feature on the topic by linkurl:clicking here.;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/home/53034/
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