Journal retracts duplicate publication

The journal Fertility and Sterility has retracted a linkurl:duplicate paper;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53061/ about the use of real-time PCR in premature ovarian failure, following a Korean researcher's linkurl:claim;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/52859/ that the work was copied from another paper he co-authored in a Korean journal. The scientist listed on both papers has been barred from contributing to the journal for three years. The paper was retracted because

By | April 26, 2007

The journal Fertility and Sterility has retracted a linkurl:duplicate paper;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53061/ about the use of real-time PCR in premature ovarian failure, following a Korean researcher's linkurl:claim;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/52859/ that the work was copied from another paper he co-authored in a Korean journal. The scientist listed on both papers has been barred from contributing to the journal for three years. The paper was retracted because it was a duplicate publication, and the decision "does not reflect on the scientific validity of the paper," according to a statement released this afternoon (April 26) by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, which publishes the journal. Stay tuned to tomorrow's news for more in-depth coverage.

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