Hwang back at work

South Korean researcher Woo-suk Hwang has apparently picked up the pieces of his life since he admitted to fabricating key findings in human embryonic stem cell research. According to the Associated Press, he has linkurl:opened a private lab;http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/06/22/asia/AS-FEA-GEN-SKorea-Disgraced-Scientist.php outside of Seoul, and taken 30 researchers with him. They are now extracting stem cells from cloned animal embryos, such as pigs and cows. "If we had been working

By | June 22, 2007

South Korean researcher Woo-suk Hwang has apparently picked up the pieces of his life since he admitted to fabricating key findings in human embryonic stem cell research. According to the Associated Press, he has linkurl:opened a private lab;http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/06/22/asia/AS-FEA-GEN-SKorea-Disgraced-Scientist.php outside of Seoul, and taken 30 researchers with him. They are now extracting stem cells from cloned animal embryos, such as pigs and cows. "If we had been working on human eggs, we could have produced human stem cells," chief scientist Kim Sue told the AP. "We are confident that we can do it now." In the first interview from a linkurl:Hwang;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/22864/ collaborator since the scandal, Kim Sue's eyes filled with tears when speaking about the effect the misconduct has had on Hwang and his colleagues. She has been working with Hwang for seven years, and co-authored one of Hwang's now-retracted papers. Does Hwang deserve a second chance to show the world linkurl:human embryonic stem cell research;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53290/ can work? Tell us what you think.

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