More labs go green all over

It appears that the link between science and building green is strengthening with each passing day. Last week, Arizona State University announced its choice of HDR Architects and Steven Ehrlich Architects to design its new Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building (ISTB) IV scheduled for completion on its Tempe campus by 2010. The university plans to seek a minimum of LEED Silver status for the 250,000-square-foot building, which will house offices and laboratories for ASU's School of Ea

By | July 3, 2007

It appears that the link between science and building green is strengthening with each passing day. Last week, Arizona State University announced its choice of HDR Architects and Steven Ehrlich Architects to design its new Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building (ISTB) IV scheduled for completion on its Tempe campus by 2010. The university plans to seek a minimum of LEED Silver status for the 250,000-square-foot building, which will house offices and laboratories for ASU's School of Earth and Science Exploration. While LEED Silver is a substantial goal, recently built labs - such as UC Santa Barbara's linkurl:Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management;http://www.bren.ucsb.edu/ and the National Renewable Laboratory's linkurl:Science and Technology Facility;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/6/1/29/1/ in Golden, Colorado - have gone the whole hog, obtaining LEED Platinum status. Meanwhile in Ohio, the linkurl:Great Lakes Science Center;http://www.glsc.org/ plans to unveil its latest green feature next week. The center will dedicate a 300 foot solar array on July 11th, with the panels adding another form of alternative energy to the wind power already generated by a 150 foot turbine that the center installed last year. While the wind turbine generates a peak 225 kilowatts per hour, the solar panels are expected to average an output of 100 kilowatt-hours per year. According to a press release issued by the center, this is enough to power all the lighting for the center's 65,000 square feet of exhibition space. As the Great Lakes Science Center is more of a science museum than a research facility, officials there will use the solar panels (as they have done with the wind turbine) to raise public awareness about alternative energy sources, with exhibits informing visitors of facts involving the solar array's power generation. And on another green education note, the linkurl:U.S. Conference of Mayors;http://usmayors.org/uscm/home.asp (the same group that recently decided my hometown of St. Louis, Missouri had the linkurl:best tasting tap water;http://www.usmayors.org/75thAnnualMeeting/pressrelease_062507b.pdf of any city in the country. Thanks?) announced a green schools resolution that urges Congress to provide funding for research into the environmental, economic, and health benefits of green K-12 schools. The resolution was introduced by Des Moines, Iowa mayor T.M. Franklin Cownie and was unanimously supported by the conference's 1,100-plus mayoral members. All this activity comes at a time when some in the wider green movement are linkurl:questioning;http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/01/fashion/01green.html whether we have forsaken the basic principles of ecological impact reduction in favor of consuming more, just in a greener way. Still wondering about the most responsible and practical way to green your lab, school, or science museum? Click on over to our linkurl:Interactive Q&A forum;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/daily/53242/ to ask our panel of green lab experts their advice.
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Avatar of: Gregory Dean

Gregory Dean

Posts: 1

January 28, 2011

As consumers look for ways to save on energy bills, many have found that using solar power is an efficient method to save money. Solar power panels are fast becoming cheaper in cost as manufacture's increase production and sales. Additionally, consumers have discovered that there are ways that they can make their own solar power panels, at less than retail in some cases.

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