Have a question about pandas?

In May, we brought you a linkurl:story;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53115/ by Jerry Guo, who traveled to China to report on efforts to boost that country's population of pandas. (See a slideshow about the panda facility linkurl:here;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/5/1/19/100/ .) One of the people Guo interviewed was Lu Zhi, director of Conservation International's China office. Zhi questioned some of China's efforts, especially those at Wolong Nature Reserve, which is planning

By | August 31, 2007

In May, we brought you a linkurl:story;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53115/ by Jerry Guo, who traveled to China to report on efforts to boost that country's population of pandas. (See a slideshow about the panda facility linkurl:here;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/5/1/19/100/ .) One of the people Guo interviewed was Lu Zhi, director of Conservation International's China office. Zhi questioned some of China's efforts, especially those at Wolong Nature Reserve, which is planning to build a facilty to house 300 pandas: "They seriously need to ask themselves why they need 300 pandas, because maintaining a captive population is not cheap," she said. As part of a week-long series on the New York Times website, Lu is taking questions about China's growth and pollution. Read more, and send her a question, linkurl:here;http://china.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/08/30/questions-for-lu-zhi/ .

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