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Korean crackdown on research

South Korean universities are apparently cracking down on research fraud following the admission by several high-profile Korean scientists (led by linkurl:Woo Suk Hwang;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/22933/ at Seoul National University) that they fabricated findings that they derived embryonic stem cells from cloned human embryos. linkurl:According to;http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/tech/tech_view.asp?newsIdx=9907&categoryCode=133 The Korean Times, 96 public and private Korean l

By | September 10, 2007

South Korean universities are apparently cracking down on research fraud following the admission by several high-profile Korean scientists (led by linkurl:Woo Suk Hwang;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/22933/ at Seoul National University) that they fabricated findings that they derived embryonic stem cells from cloned human embryos. linkurl:According to;http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/tech/tech_view.asp?newsIdx=9907&categoryCode=133 The Korean Times, 96 public and private Korean laboratories have established "verification systems" set to derail plagiarism and fabricated findings. According to the Ministry of Science and Technology, this type of checking system was previously present at only 15 schools or institutions. The ministry plans to also disseminate an ethics guidebook next month. Earlier this year, Korea University president Lee Pil Sang resigned after less than two months when an investigation concluded he plagiarized six papers.
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Comments

Avatar of: Michael

Michael

Posts: 3

September 12, 2007

As a Korean-American, I feel the biggest problem with the Korean society is the opposing pressures that are placed on all individuals.\n\nThere is an enormous amount of pressure to succeed academically, and almost an equal amount of pressure to maintain integrity. This isn't to imply that other societies don't emphasize both success and integrity, but it seems that there's usually more emphasis on one versus the other. The Koreans seem to believe you can have both, but the result is often an emphasis on success at the expense of integrity, as seen by the recent admissions of falsification of data.\n\nSince we should be learning from our mistakes, I hope the Korean society realizes that having success and integrity as two of the top goals in life can often lead to an internal conflict that compromises one at the expense of the other. It's time to accept failure, which the Koreans are known for not tolerating, as something that can be positive, and hopefully that will carry over into fewer issues with integrity.
Avatar of: Eugene

Eugene

Posts: 1

September 13, 2007

You wrote:\n"having success and integrity ... can often lead to an internal conflict that compromises one at the expense of the other" -- that's a faulty philosophy, which I believe only a few Koreans follow (I am Russian BTW). If you (whatever national) are a good decent person, there CAN NOT ABSOLUTELY be a compromise between success and integrity otherwise THAT IS NOT A SUCCESS (successful robber, impressive killer...)\nI do not believe there is a big national problem of being or not being honest -- for any nation.

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