NIH and NASA firm up space plans

In July, The Scientist linkurl:reported;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53389/ on plans for a collaboration between NASA and NIH to conduct life science experiments aboard the International Space Station. Those plans, it seems, are taking off, with the two agencies holding a public signing at the Capitol tomorrow (Sept. 12) of a memorandum sealing the deal. The linkurl:release;http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/sep2007/od-10.htm from NIH does not specify projects for the collaboration, sayi

By | September 12, 2007

In July, The Scientist linkurl:reported;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53389/ on plans for a collaboration between NASA and NIH to conduct life science experiments aboard the International Space Station. Those plans, it seems, are taking off, with the two agencies holding a public signing at the Capitol tomorrow (Sept. 12) of a memorandum sealing the deal. The linkurl:release;http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/sep2007/od-10.htm from NIH does not specify projects for the collaboration, saying only that plan "will help American scientists utilize the International Space Station." According to the NIH press office, many of the proposals for specific projects will likely come from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, whose director, Stephen Katz, is the NIH liaison to NASA. Research will presumably be set to commence after completion of the space station in about three years. Attending tomorrow's meeting will be NIH director Elias Zerhouni, who will sign for NIH on the agreement, and at least one senator, Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas), a long-time champion of space science and member of the Science and Space Subcommittee of the Senate Commerce Committee. Have thoughts about biomedical research in space? Leave a linkurl:comment;http://prod27.the-scientist.com/forum/addcomment/53582/ and let us know.

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