Vote for your favorite life science blogs

Have your say in compiling the first list of the most popular life science blogs as decided by you, the community

By | September 18, 2007

Love them or loathe them, there's no denying that life sciences blogs are having an influence on the way researchers communicate about issues that matter to them. With the number of blogs steadily growing, though, newcomers to the life science blogosphere could be forgiven for finding it difficult to discover the must-read blogs in their particular area. Apart from one analysis of the most popular science blogs last year, and an anthology of some of the best blog posts in 2006, there's really no guide to help inform you about what blogs you should be reading if you are interested in exploring the blogosphere.
So, we at The Scientist are asking you to help compile the first list of the best life science blogs. Tell us what your favorite life science blogs are and why by clicking the button and leaving a comment, and we will publish a list of the most popular choices across the different areas of life sciences. With your help we hope to provide a list of who is currently hot in the science blogosphere, and why you should be reading them. To start things off, we've asked some of the best known science bloggers to nominate some of their favorite blogs. Add to the list by posting your choices here, and these will appear below the list in the comments section. In the spirit of blog-like openness, we hope people discuss their favorite science blogs elsewhere. If people on your blog are having an interesting discussion thread about this, then post a link to that page, and we'll count those suggestions too.
Abel Pharmboy Terra Sigillata Respectful Insolence: Written by Orac, a physician-scientist who is a rare surgeon holding a NIH R01 grant This highly-trafficked blog covers all aspects of medicine, often with a cancer emphasis, and stresses critical thinking in the face of pseudoscience, very often with biting precision. In The Pipeline: Written by Derek Lowe, a pharmaceutical chemist in the industry who provides unique insights into Pharma. Although the focus is on chemistry, Lowe provides many general lessons in mentoring and career choices. Adventures in Ethics and Science: Written by San Jose State University assistant professor Janet Stemwedel who holds dual PhDs in physical chemistry and philosophy. Janet writes with thoughtful clarity on ethical conundrums in science, the challenges of women in science and engineering, and K-12 science education. [Disclaimer: Although I recommended two fellow bloggers at ScienceBlogs, I was reading both long before we were all asked to join the community]
Bora Zivkovic (a.k.a. Coturnix) A Blog Around The Clock Paring down the number to three is a very difficult task -- my blogroll has hundreds of life-science blogs and I have listed some of my favorites (most but not all life-science) here. I suspect that most people will nominate a small number of most popular blogs, so here are some smaller, less-well-known, but delightful blogs I've been enjoying recently: Pondering Pikaia Anterior Comissure Laelaps
Carl Zimmer The Loom My three favorite blogs are not the result of any systematic survey of the blogosphere, just what has gotten snagged in my RSS feeds during my random search. In no order: Pharyngula: PZ Myers, the author of this blog, dedicates a lot of posts to politics and religion. But his posts on evolution, development, and cephalopod sex are invariably excellent. Scientific American: Probably the best melding of traditional science media with the blog format. Tree of Life: A highly personal blog from biologist Jonathan Eisen on genomics, phylogeny, and open access. [Editor's note: CZ has also contributed articles to Scientific American, both in print and online]
Ed Silverman Pharmalot Which blogs do I turn to each day? To be honest, I look at a couple of dozen, and I look at each of them more than once. Why? I'm always curious to find newly unearthed stories (whether it's an originally reported scoop or a link to one); fresh insights into important topics, and a dollop of irreverence. For me, a good blog has a mix of all three, but will also post frequently. More blogs offer these virtues all the time, so choosing just three is difficult. But over the past few months, I would say the following trio are consistent must-reads for what I do and enjoy.... PharmaGossip: The sly Insider may be anonymous, but we know he's an experienced industry marketing veteran and speaks with the kind of authority that makes clear he's seen it all -- and more. Sure, he can be all over the map with music, political videos and posts that some may find sexist. But Jack Friday -- his nom de pharma -- has a knack for finding cutting-edge items to read and watch. And he has a wicked sense of humor, which is often what's needed to digest some of the news. The Health Blog from the Wall Street Journal: This blog is a bit of an odd duck. The voice is constrained because the site hews very closely to the tone of the newspaper. As a result, there's little personality, but what makes the site worthwhile is the regular supply of fresh news and analysis. And this is helped along by contributions from WSJ staffers. As a result, this sometimes reads like an extension of the mothership. But the posts -- which veer back and forth between hardcore pharma news and a wide array of health items -- are often timely and reliable. KevinMD: The doc doesn't blog so much as aggregate. But he's a darned good aggregator. He has a sharp eye for interesting and amusing tales that offer a much-needed peek into the machinations of the medical community. The posts are typically introduced with a pithy line before a link takes you elsewhere. But the variety, frequency and volume of posts makes for an educating and, often, entertaining visit. This is the place to go to learn what doctors are thinking and saying about patients, insurers, drugmakers and even each other.
Newamul Khan (a.k.a. Razib) Gene Expression Mixing Memory: Translates scientific concepts from a field which everyone thinks they understand intuitively, psychology, and makes it genuinely comprehensible to those outside the field. Evolgen: A targeted focus on the area of evolution & genetics which has an appeal to both those with a deep interest in the topic as well someone just browsing and taste testing. A definite "value added" to a discipline with broad appeal and relevance. John Hawks: No question, the "must read" weblog for anyone interested in human evolution. Covers the gamut of the field, from bones to genes.
PZ Myers Pharyngula Sandwalk: First rate evolutionary biology and biochemistry from a strongly opinionated curmudgeon. Creek Running North: A nature writer's blog, and a very writerly blog it is, that combines humor and a love of the environment. ERV: Enthusiastic grad student in molecular biology with a ferocious view of creationism. There are so many more... I have a long list here, every one of them deserving.
Attila Csordas Partial Immortalization Instead of picking three individual blogs, I'd like to mention three topic-related branches of blogs or blog aggregators, referring this way to many individual bloggers and a larger amount of information and information filters. The groups are: a) science blogs written by scientists, b) science related blogs written by journalists and editors, and c) technology and web related blogs written by "alpha geeks and early adopters." a. science blogs written by scientists: Ouroboros: Chris Patil, postdoc in Judith Campisi's lab at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, reviews articles on the biology of aging, also called biogerontology. The model for Ouroboros was Science Magazine's SAGE KE. Daily Transcript: Alex Palazzo, a postdoc at Harvard Medical School, very good mix of hardcore science and general science related material. b. science related blogs written by journalists: My main sources are blogs of the Nature Publishing Group, which fortunately has an aggregator site called Planet Nature. Out of those my three favorites are: Nascent: Written by Natureplex people (Nature Web Publishing Group) like Timo Hannay and Euan Edie, on the forefront of the advanced scientific web. Nautilus: Maxine Clarke, Nature's Publishing Executive Editor shares with us insider NPG information at an amazing pace, answering all the questions in the comment section. The Niche: The stem cell blog behind Nature Reports Stem Cells, written by professional journalists and editors Monya Baker and Natalie DeWitt. (Disclaimer: one of my pieces was published at The Niche once) c. technology and Web-related blogs written by "alpha geeks, early adopters, hackers": O'Reilly Radar: A group blog of the O'Reilly publishing folks concentrating on everything new and early and free in Web technology. Main blogger is Tim O'Reilly, Web 2.0 founding father. Make: Home of amazing and sometimes pretty useful DIY projects, main blogger is Philip Torrone. Belongs to O'Reilly Media Inc. Editor's note (September 24): A few life science bloggers have correctly pointed out that no female bloggers are represented above. While this is not intentional -- several female bloggers were contacted for the article -- it is regrettable and in no way reflective of our opinions here at The Scientist. Help us to redress any apparent imbalances, whether it be gender, or other lesser-discussed disparities like geographical location and ethnicity, by adding suitable nominations to the growing list below. -- Additional links in this article: "Top five science blogs," Nature News, July 5, 2006. http://www.nature.com/news/2006/060703/full/442009a.html B. Zivkovik, "The Open Laboratory: The Best Writing on Science Blogs 2006." http://www.lulu.com/content/631016
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Comments

Avatar of: Solomon Rivlin

Solomon Rivlin

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

Dr. Free-ride does an excellent job balancing her writing skills, scientific knowledge, intriguing issues and personal touch to make her blog a most enjoyable and interesting one.
Avatar of: Deepak Singh

Deepak Singh

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

As a science blogger following a gazillion blogs, this task is about as tough as it gets, but I am going to list my top 5 in order of how excited I get to see a post from one of them\n\n1. Public Rambling - Pedro Beltrao\n2. Discovering Biology in a Digital World - Sandra Porter\n3. What you're doing is rather desperate - Neil Saunders\n4. In the Pipeline - Derek Lowe \n5. The Loom - Carl Zimmer\n\n\nThey cover informatics, general science and drug development
Avatar of: Steve

Steve

Posts: 2

September 18, 2007

Omni Brain! lol\nhttp://www.scienceblogs.com/omnibrain
Avatar of: Dave Wessner

Dave Wessner

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

This blog (http://the-aids-pandemic.blogspot.com) and associated podcast examine all aspects of HIV/AIDS, including scientific, culture, and political issues. Recent posts have ranged from a discussion of HIV/AIDS as a national security threat to Cyndi Lauper's True Colors tour for the Human Rights Campaign. And, best of all, most of the installments are by undergraduate students. The blog and podcast are the outgrowth of a class project at Davidson College, and demonstrate the educational value of these media not only for the audiences, but also for the contributors.
Avatar of: Kausik Datta

Kausik Datta

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

1. Pharyngula - by Prof. PZ Myers.\n2. Aetiology - by Dr. Tara Smith.\n3. Pure Pedantry - by would-be Dr. Jake Young and Ms. Contreary.\n4. Respectful Insolence - by Orac.\n5. Sandwalk - by Prof. Larry Moran.\nOff the top of my head. The numbers do not indicate order of preference... I like these blogs because of the intelligent writing style, the biology, the philosophy and the rationality inherent in them. Plus, put in substantial amount of great commenters, with a dash of occasional trolls who revel in making a public display of their ignorance - and there is a winning recipé in each one of them.
Avatar of: Jessamyn Smyth

Jessamyn Smyth

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

Creek Running North for naturalist essay, paleontology, geologic history, and other unpredictable goodness.
Avatar of: Cesar Sanchez

Cesar Sanchez

Posts: 3

September 18, 2007

At the moment, these are my favorite microbiology blogs:\n\n- Small Things Considered - Moselio (Elio) Schaechter. A blog for sharing appreciation of the width and depth of microbes and microbial activities on this planet.\n- MicrobiologyBytes - Alan Cann. The latest news about microbiology in a form that everyone can understand.\n\nAnd here you have other favorite life sciences blogs:\n\n- The Evilutionary Biologist - John Dennehy. All science, all the time.\n- Bad Science - Ben Goldacre. Against pseudoscience, with a sense of humor.\n- The Loom\n- Sandwalk\n- El PaleoFreak [in Spanish] - El PaleoFreak. He didn't have a childhood but a prehistory (comments on evolution). [No tuvo infancia, tuvo prehistoria (comentarios sobre evolución)]
Avatar of: Drugmonkey

Drugmonkey

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

\n\nYoungFemaleScientist: pitch perfect recitation of the disgruntled postdoc's woes\nFemaleScienceProfessor: hilarious anecdotes of the academic troglodytes she experiences\nMedical Writing, Editing & Grantsmanship: Essential reading for the NIH-supported scientist

September 18, 2007

http://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/\n\nEvodevo rocks. Dr. Myers does a fine job of teasing out the nuances of development and evolution. He also "rants" in support of an evolutionary perspective (and in opposition to anti-science anti-evolutionists).\n\nI do wish readers could easily sort for entries on science topics vs. political. (This is a weakness of the scienceblogs site in general.)\n\nIn the case of pharyngula, posts span a spectrum from valuable and well thought out commentary on developmental biology and other science topics to personal political opinion.
Avatar of: Sandra

Sandra

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

I enjoy many of the blogs selected by your expert bloggers. One that was overlooked but deserving of praise is The Neurocritic, a cognitive neuroscientist deconstructing research with a sly mix of technical detail, pop culture and humor.
Avatar of: ctenotrish, FCD

ctenotrish, FCD

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

I like the notion of listing a few (can't list 'em all) in the order of how excited I am when there is a new post:\n\n1. Pharyngula\n2. Respectful Insolence\n3. Signout\n4. Adventures in Ethics and Science (especially Friday Sprog Blogging)\n5. Panda's Thumb

September 18, 2007

Pharyngula - PZ Myers\n\nRespectful Insolence - Orac\n\nBad Astronomy - Phil Plait\n\n
Avatar of: Anna Sebestyen

Anna Sebestyen

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

I like the way Attila is presenting news, info and comments on current biotech issues, and also his vision of a more tech savvy and open biotech research community. He is totally committed to what he is writing about (mostly stem cell research, and occasional infotech - geek - apple etc. things), which is very convincing, and helps him to keep his fingers on the IT/BT pulse of these days.\n\nDisclaimer: Attila is my husband, so I cannot but be partial (sic!). :)
Avatar of: A Palazzo

A Palazzo

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

As a scientist who spends a lot of time at the bench, I prefer blogs by researchers.\n\nDan Rhoads' Migrations\nSunil Laxman's Balancing Life\nRPM's evolgen\nand two group blogs Biocurious and Gene Expression (Classic)
Avatar of: Sandra Porter

Sandra Porter

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

This is a very, very hard question to answer because there are many blogs that I enjoy.\n\nHere are some of my top reads, not necessarily in order:\n1. Omics! Omics! by Keith Robison\n2. Eye on DNA by Hsien-Hsien Lei\n3. The Genetic Genealogist by Blaine Bettinger\n4. business|bites|genes|molecules by Deepak Singh\n5. bootstrap analysis\n 7. Living the Scientific Life by Grrl Scientist\n8. Bug Girl
Avatar of: Hank Roberts

Hank Roberts

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

Real Climate\nEffect Measure\nStoat
Avatar of: Chris

Chris

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

For more fun than your average science blog, read Jacks of Science !\n\nP.S. The greatest science blog is certainly Improbable Research! \n\n
Avatar of: John Dennehy

John Dennehy

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

I'd like to mention a few that haven't been mentioned above...\n\nThis Week in Evolution--covering the recent biological literature\nBioephemera--the nexus of biology and art\nBehavioral Ecology--writings from a Peromyscus researcher\nInterrogating Nature--biology thru the eyes of a UT undergrad\nTwisted Bacteria--hardcore microbiology\n\nfrom the Evilutionary Biologist\n\n
Avatar of: PZ Myers

PZ Myers

Posts: 1

September 18, 2007

Actually, you can get just the science posts at Pharyngula, if the liberal politics and uppity atheism disturb you. Just use this link:\n\nhttp://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/science/\n\n\n
Avatar of: Abby

Abby

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

http://scientianatura.blogspot.com

September 19, 2007

http://www.johnhawks.net/weblog

September 19, 2007

I enjoy the taste of science that Carl Zimmer gives us, with insight into the discoveries shortly after they occur, timely and informative.
Avatar of: chris diephuis

chris diephuis

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

every day something new, and a great deal paleoanthropology
Avatar of: roberto

roberto

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

I had once a very long list of science blogs in my aggregator. Today, this is the only one I'm keeping.
Avatar of: John Sourdis

John Sourdis

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

I like the Seven Stones. It is a very interesting blog which covers all aspects of the rapidly growing and interdisciplinary field of systems and synthetic biology.
Avatar of: ALEX

ALEX

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

I VOTE FOR THE MAKE BLOG
Avatar of: Christophe Thill

Christophe Thill

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

PZ Myers rules. His articles about biology are wonderfully informative. His radical atheist positions are always spot on. Sometimes he goes just a little bit too far; but I've never found him guilty of weak reasoning or inconsistent positions. And he's also capable of surprisingly poetic or philosophical reflexions. I really wish I'd had this guy as a university teacher.
Avatar of: Jake

Jake

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

I like MAKE because it encourages tinkering and active involvement in science, not just observing from the sidelines.
Avatar of: Brandon King

Brandon King

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

http://directneuralinterface.blogspot.com
Avatar of: SteveF

SteveF

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

1) John Hawks\n2) Respectful Insolence - Orac\n3) Genomicron - T Ryan Gregory\n4) Pharyngula - PZ Myers\n5) This Week in Evolution - R Ford Denison
Avatar of: Jeff Huang

Jeff Huang

Posts: 2

September 19, 2007

I enjoy reading PIMM (http://pimm.wordpress.com/) by Attila Csordas. The blog is very informative with regards to regenerative medicine research and new technology. But what makes PIMM an interesting blog is that it does not just passively report news on stem cell research and regeneration. PIMM is motivated by a genuine fascination (or perhaps obsession) for life extension and immortality. \n\nThe blog is also fun and geeky (in a good way). A few examples posted on PIMM, which I think demonstrates the fun/geek element in PIMM and stands out from many other blogs (that I find occasionally dry or whiny) are: Pecha Kucha for scientists, and Vote for your favorite lab websites.
Avatar of: Adam

Adam

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

* The IN VIVO Blog: http://invivoblog.blogspot.com\n\n* The Wall Street Journal Health Care Blog: http://blogs.wsj.com/health\n\n* DrugWonks: http://drugwonks.com/\n\n* The Health Care Blog: http://www.thehealthcareblog.com\n\n* Bad Science: http://www.badscience.net\n\n* In The Pipeline: http://pipeline.corante.com\n\n* VentureBeat: http://venturebeat.com/category/lifesciences
Avatar of: Pedro Beltrao

Pedro Beltrao

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

It is hard to pick one given the different fields, personalities and writing styles. \n\nHere is a list of some of my favorite blogs:\nBioinformatics Zen\nbusiness|bytes|genes|molecules\nEvolgen \nNodalpoint\nNascent\nThe Seven Stones\nWhat You're Doing Is Rather Desperate\n\n
Avatar of: Sam Chen

Sam Chen

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

There are a lot of good science blogs there. Here are a few I suggest.\n\n1. Uncommon Descent (William A. Dembski)\n2. Evolution News and Views (Discovery Institute)\n3. ID the Future (Discovery Institute)\n
Avatar of: Steph

Steph

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

In no particular order:\n\n1. John Hawks http://www.johnhawks.net/weblog\n2. Afarensis http://scienceblogs.com/afarensis/\n3. Laelaps http://laelaps.wordpress.com/\n4. Primate Diaries http://primatediaries.blogspot.com/
Avatar of: Bill Bagby

Bill Bagby

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

John Hawks by far - absolutely superlative, timely and informative.
Avatar of: Shawn Hurst

Shawn Hurst

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

I love John Hawks' weblog- I read it everyday.
Avatar of: NLB

NLB

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

John Hawks' site is great for students of paleoanthro!
Avatar of: LisaS

LisaS

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Pharyngula is my favorite blog because of the great posts on science and the intersection of science and culture. I learn something new every day! The worldwide community of "Pharynguloids" keeps the blog lively and allows readers to learn about others' perspectives.
Avatar of: Jonathan Eisen

Jonathan Eisen

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Many of my favorites are already posted on here including Pharyngula and Evolgen, The Loom and pretty much everything at Scienceblogs, so I thought I would post some perhaps less well known ones here. \n\nOne is the Genome Technology Magazine's Open Reading Frame . Very personal and sometimes over the top and quite interesting.\n\nAnother one that is growing on me is Epidemix . \n\nAnd finally, I truly LOVE Rosie Redfield's RRResearch Blog where she discusses openly her active research and all its failings and promise.
Avatar of: Milford Wolpoff

Milford Wolpoff

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Super. Better than super.
Avatar of: Jacalyn Royce

Jacalyn Royce

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

fascinating daily updates and honest reviews of scientific literature, plus COMEDY!
Avatar of: G

G

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

My favorite by far is John Hawks' Anthropology weblog. Very well written, informative, and easy to understand. Quite funny at times as well. Superfantastic!\n\nI also read Gene Expression (both classic and Scienceblog versions) every day.
Avatar of: Ron

Ron

Posts: 2

September 19, 2007

1.effect measure\n2.aetiology\n3.savage minds\n4.pure pedantry
Avatar of: Steve Higgins

Steve Higgins

Posts: 2

September 19, 2007

Well First of all the Discovery Institute blogs do not count as science...\nNow thats out of the way...\n\nMy favorite science blogs:\nRetrospectacle\nAnterior Commisure\nA Good Poop\nImprobable Research\nand a bunch more really!
Avatar of: carolyn13

carolyn13

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

I'm fairly new to the Science blogs and I only have one favorite so far, Neurophilosophy. No one is better at explaining brain function in a way that a lay person can grasp.
Avatar of: Suzi

Suzi

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

I've been reading this site for several months. I am not a scientist, but I find it informative and interesting.
Avatar of: Sunil

Sunil

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

I enjoy both "hard science" blogs as well as blogs about life in science. "Favorite" is a strong word, but here are five science blogs I visit very regularly.\n\nLarry Moran's Sandwalk\n\nAlex Palazzo's Daily transcript\n\nBora's Blog around the clock\n\nPharyngula\n\nAetiology
Avatar of: S Juno

S Juno

Posts: 2

September 19, 2007

http://www.horizonpress.com/blogger/\nMy favourite Life Science Blog!\n\nMicrobiology news and views to help the busy scientist keep up-to-date on current research, forthcoming conferences, hot research topics, high impact publications, and much more.
Avatar of: Steve Juno

Steve Juno

Posts: 2

September 19, 2007

Avatar of: Dan Rhoads

Dan Rhoads

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

A lot of great science blogs have already been mentioned, including Pharyngula, The Daily Transcript, A Blog Around the Clock, Laelaps and The Loom.\n\nA very noteworthy blog that I don't see is the Neurophilosopher's blog, with some excellent posts on the history of biology, and neurobiology in particular, of late.\n\nAlso underappreciated are Ouroboros, Public Rambling, Deep Sea News, and business|bytes|genes|molecules.\n\n
Avatar of: Matt Bull

Matt Bull

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Incredibly well-written evolutionary biology. Hard to beat this one.
Avatar of: .

.

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

http://scientianatura.blogspot.com\n\nScientia Natura: Evolution and Rationality
Avatar of: beldar

beldar

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

The Planetary Society blog by Emily Lakdawalla - www.planetary.org\n\nThe Loom by Carl Zimmer - www.scienceblogs.com/loom\n\nRespectful Insolence by Orac - www.scienceblogs.com/insolence\n\n
Avatar of: Jim Mirick

Jim Mirick

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

This is just one of the best science blogs on any field -- I only wish that 40 years ago I could have taken a course from him, I might have chucked Economics for what was really my first love.
Avatar of: Anthony D

Anthony D'Andrea

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Pharyngula (http://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/)\nExcellent discussions of developmental and evolutionary biology. Evolution vs. creationism and current incarnation (intelligent design) openly debated\n\n\nRespectful Insolence (http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/)\nDiscussions of skepticism, good science, and medical issues. Best posts include the slow creep of alternative medicine into mainstream medicine and the debate over immunizations and autism.
Avatar of: Alexander Vargas

Alexander Vargas

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

A higher brow blog than pharyngula, that draws better participants. Despite some simplistic views of Larry Moran, complete lack of censorship allows commenters of all color to express themselves.
Avatar of: Chris

Chris

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

My favorites, in no particular order, are \n\nJohn Hawks\n\nLanguage Log\n\nRealClimate\n\nCosmic Variance\n\nThe Neurocritic\n\nRetrospectacle\n\nGene Expression\n\n\n\n
Avatar of: EM

EM

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

tdj.livejournal.com is one of the best science blogs I've read. It's peppered with observations about his own research, his teaching, others' teaching, others' research, pop science, non-pop science, humorous science-related photos . . . It's fantastic!

September 19, 2007

I'm interested in public understanding of the life sciences and therefore I use to read Biomedicine on Display (http://www.corporeality.net/museion). This is the first blog that covers public understanding of biomedicine and the life sciences, especially through medical exhbitions and medical museums. Cool design!
Avatar of: shadra d

shadra d

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

http://tdj.livejournal.com/\n\nPoster of some of the most interesting science news I can never find by myself on the internet, usually adding his own perspective on things with short paragraphs instead of gigantic opinionated articles that I have no time to casually read.
Avatar of: JJ

JJ

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Pharyngula\nAetiology\nThe Loom\nPanda's Thumb\nThus Spake Zuska
Avatar of: Kate

Kate

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

I'm a big fan of tdj. He reads everything, finds the good stuff and tells you exactly what to read. His comments are brief, easy to follow and interesting!
Avatar of: Joy

Joy

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

http://tdj.livejournal.com/
Avatar of: coturnix

coturnix

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Just a reminder that, as much as blogs like Bad Astronomy, Cocktail Party Physics or some technology blogs (e.g., Make) are wonderful, this survey is about Life Science blogs, i.e., blogs with a more-or-less regular coverage of biology and medicine.\n\nAlso, 'Uncommon Descent', 'Evolution News and Views' and 'ID the Future' are, by definition, not science blogs.\n\nFinally, please add more blogs written by women - they are woefully missing from this list. Along those already mentioned (Aetiology, Anterior Commissure, Pondering Pikaia, Living the Scientific Life, etc.) I'd like to add:\n \nhttp://chernobyl-summer.blogspot.com/\nhttp://nuthatch.typepad.com/\nhttp://sciencefictionbiology.blogspot.com/\nhttp://www.drpetra.co.uk/blog/\nhttp://bioephemera.com/\nhttp://invasivespecies.blogspot.com/\nhttp://gonesavage.wordpress.com/\nhttp://ipath.blogs.com/zygotegames/\nhttp://joolya.blogspot.com/\nhttp://science.easternblot.net/\nhttp://thewelltimedperiod.blogspot.com/\nhttp://www.intueri.org/\nhttp://www.emergiblog.com/\nhttp://www.eyeondna.com/
Avatar of: Cletus

Cletus

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

johnhawks.net has my vote!
Avatar of: Nicole

Nicole

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Terry's blog over on livejournal, even an artist like me with no science know-how at all can find entertaining and interesting info. Mainly because he's awesome.
Avatar of: Nick Samew

Nick Samew

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

http://nature-wonder.livejournal.com\nThis blog provides you with various links to Life sciense issues: evolution, biology, ethology, neurosciense etc.\n\nAnd here are famous\nhttp://www.mindhacks.com/\nhttp://scienceblogs.com/loom/\nhttp://sandwalk.blogspot.com/
Avatar of: Sandra Porter

Sandra Porter

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Chances are most of your readers will know the difference, but just in case there's anyone who doesn't know, I thought someone should point out that three of the blogs in the list are not science blogs, they are creationist blogs.\n\nCreationism is not science for reasons that almost all scientists understand. (There are always a few odd exceptions, just like there are people who believe that we never went to the moon and that OJ Simpson is being hounded because he knows the truth, and not for other, more obvious reasons.)\n\nIf you're wondering which list it is, it's the one that contains two blogs from the Discovery Institute. \n\n\n
Avatar of: Deech56

Deech56

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Top three:\n\nRealClimate.org: real climatologists who explain climate research in terms we can all understand.\n\nRespectful Insolence: Orac is very good writer and his glimpses into the world of medicine are enlightening.\n\nThe Loom: Carl Zimmer is one of the best science writers around. Period. He captures the curiosity on which we scientists thrive.\n\nHonorable mention: Chris Mooney's "Intersection", Pharyngula, Eli Rabett, Tamino's Open Mind.

September 19, 2007

I see a certain consensus forming here in the comments. Apparently, I have a different taste.\nMost of the blogs mentioned here have a focus on ID bashing, showing how stupid other people are, and, of course reiterating the benefits of OA publishing over and over. Unfortunately, there is typically only little science involved.\n\nMy favorite is Mystery Rays . Ian does a fantastic job in writing accessible real-science posts, mainly about antigen presentation and related topics.\n\nRunners-up are Fungal Genomes , YOKOFAKUN , and some more which have been mentioned before (the daily transcript, what-you're-doing-is-rather-desperate, Tree of life, etc.)
Avatar of: R Stone

R Stone

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

The only science blog I enjoy enough to read every day is TDJ over at http://tdj.livejournal.com. His commentary on current science issues and developments is witty and informed, and appeals to a wide and adoring audience.
Avatar of: Steve Frishcosy

Steve Frishcosy

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

http://tdj.livejournal.com\n\nThis guy's blog combines fascinating news-making science and his own entertaining takes on things in a way that makes reading highbrow science fun. An absolute joy to read!
Avatar of: anjou

anjou

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Two favorites are\nTerra Sigillata \nRespectful Insolence

September 19, 2007

These are the five I find myself frequenting the most (in no particular order):\n\nLaelaps\n\nThe Ethical Palaeontologist\n\nLiving the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)\n\nThe Other 95%\n\nTetrapod Zoology
Avatar of: Robin Link

Robin Link

Posts: 2

September 19, 2007

Pharyngula.
Avatar of: CCD

CCD

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Besides Derek Lowe's excellent In the Pipeline:\n\nPharmagossip\nTerra Sigillata\nPharma Marketing Blog
Avatar of: Kathy

Kathy

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

As a lymphoma survivor, having options available to me if further treatment is needed is, of course, very important to me. Abel Pharmboy, author of the blog "Terra Sigillata", was recently instrumental in helping to publicize efforts to influence the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to increase reimbursement of two radioimmunotherapy (RIT) drugs that are showing promise in the treatment of lymphomas. This, along with much of the other information he posts, gets my vote for favorite science blog!
Avatar of: TheProbe

TheProbe

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

There are a few things I do every day...mostly automated bodily functions and those things necessary for life. \n\nReading Respectful Insolence is one of my daily habits that I do by choice. A day without Insolence is like, well, February 30th.
Avatar of: Katsu Bean

Katsu Bean

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Best Paleoanthropology Blog\nwww.johnhawks.net\n\nBest Anthropology Blog\nwww.perezhilton.com\n
Avatar of: Mike Ro

Mike Ro

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

1 vote for Abel Pharmboy
Avatar of: Ralph Holloway

Ralph Holloway

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Best around! Always erudite, humorous when need be, and most often very helpful, as it is always well-referenced.
Avatar of: Jed Harris

Jed Harris

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

Deric Bownds' Mindblog\nhttp://mindblog.dericbownds.net/
Avatar of: Mike Traynor

Mike Traynor

Posts: 1

September 19, 2007

My favourite science blog is Tetrapod Zoology by the infectiously enthusiastic paleontologist Darren Naish. Focused on tetrapods, including paleontology (dinosaurs are Darren's specialty) and some cryptozoology, almost every post by Darren sends me off looking up animals I'd never heard of before.\n\n
Avatar of: Alexey Lutay

Alexey Lutay

Posts: 1

September 20, 2007

It is very interesting and useful resource!\nI love it and have subscribed it both via e-mail and RSS subscription.\n
Avatar of: Anne Gilbert

Anne Gilbert

Posts: 1

September 20, 2007

I really like the John Hawks Paleoanthropology Weblog. Why? Because Hawks is knowledgeable, very informative, and keeps up with the latest biological anthropology news that's "out there". I rate him so highly that he has a link on my blog, *The Writer's Daily Grind*, which is really a "writing" blog, not a science one, although the kind of writing I'm doing relates to his field. \n\nSince I also own and moderate a paleoanthropology e-mail list, Palanthsci(a Yahoogroup), Hawks rates a link there, and I often post links on the list to his latest comments. Many of the members appreciate this link, and Hawks himself has posted there.\n\nFinally, and perhaps most important, Hawks has a wonderful sense of humor. His posts are frequently laugh-out-loud funny, for he comments on the way prehistoric humans, or some scientific finds, are perceived by the "public", which is, well, frequently very funny.
Avatar of: Paul Ferry

Paul Ferry

Posts: 1

September 20, 2007

http://fishfeet2007.blogspot.com. Sarda presents a creative and imaginative angle on science blogs. She makes things personal and writes at a level that everyone can enjoy.
Avatar of: alison campbell

alison campbell

Posts: 1

September 20, 2007

for Orac's incisive take on pseudoscience and critical thinking - almost always an excellent read & one that I recommend to my students. Yay Orac!
Avatar of: Andy McFarlane

Andy McFarlane

Posts: 1

September 20, 2007

I'm not a huge science blog reader, but I do enjoy two Michigan-based blogs that make the life sciences more accessible to everyday folks while still retaining enough technicality to be interesting: bootstrap analysis and Urban Dragon Hunters.
Avatar of: Malcolm Loftus

Malcolm Loftus

Posts: 1

September 20, 2007

One I try and read everyday
Avatar of: John Routh

John Routh

Posts: 1

September 20, 2007

Excellent resource for information on non-native species and their impact on local ecosystems. Not only North American information but also information from other parts of the world as well.
Avatar of: Amiya Sarkar

Amiya Sarkar

Posts: 2

September 20, 2007

Excellently presented knowledge based articles on microbiology and related sciences. I firmly recommend this site for those, having an interest in the subject.

September 20, 2007

Please consider including some of the blogs in The DNA Network, a collection of bloggers writing about genetics, genomics, and DNA.\n\nThank you!\n

September 20, 2007

1. Deep-Sea News\nhttp://scienceblogs.com/deepseanews/\nFrequent updates, fabulous photos, and entertaining writing\n\n2. The Other 95%\nhttp://other95.blogspot.com/\nAll things invertebrate, a new 'spineless song of the week' (original recordings) and more!\n\n3. Bayblab\nhttp://bayblab.blogspot.com/\nA terrific grab bag from 'a bunch of degenerate grad students'\n\n4. Small Things Considered\nhttp://schaechter.asmblog.org/schaechter/\nA great microbiology blog sponsored by the American Society for Microbiology\n\n5. Twisted Bacteria\nhttp://twistedbacteria.blogspot.com/\nMore microbiology but with unique posts that make it worth the visit
Avatar of: Joshua Zelinsky

Joshua Zelinsky

Posts: 1

September 20, 2007

1. Pharyngula (PZ Meyers)\n2. Aetiology (Tara Smith) \n3. The Loom (Carl Zimmer)\n4. Good Math, Bad Math (Mark Chu-Carroll)\n\nIn all these cases three things stand out that make these blogs top of the line. First, the ability to explain complicated notions to people with some background but aren't experts in the field in question. Second, point one does not generally occur at the cost of oversimplifying. Third, each blogs contain a variety of different topics rather than harping on a limited set of themes.
Avatar of: RJanicek

RJanicek

Posts: 1

September 20, 2007

Salient mind food.

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