Biggest losers win pennant

A couple of months ago I linkurl:compared the ineptitude of the Philadelphia Phillies with the pharma industry. ;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/8/1/13/1/ Well, good news!

By | September 30, 2007

A couple of months ago I linkurl:compared the ineptitude of the Philadelphia Phillies with the pharma industry. ;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/8/1/13/1/ Well, good news! The Phillies have turned things around. Having picked up the 10,000th loss of their history on 15 July, they today won the National League East title and head to the playoffs for the first time in 14 years. We can all take inspiration from this. I can. The pharmaceutical industry can. There's a lot of talent in the pharma industry, and there are incredible resources and a huge amount of information to build upon. But the mix has to be right, with a combination of passion and good science leading the way. Not cynicism and bean counting. Here is linkurl:an example of the latter. ;http://pipeline.corante.com/archives/2007/09/24/good_news_from_the_hr_department.php Blogging this kind sheds light on the industry. It is painful, but it's vitally important.

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