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New World flora and fauna, circa 1585

In May, Bill Sharfman linkurl:wrote about;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53253/ a London exhibit of works by John White, a 16th-century painter and traveler. They are of what might be considered well-known items: A pineapple, a plantain, and a Portuguese Man O' War. As Sharfman pointed out, however, "when White painted these images in 1585, they represented England's first glimpse of the flora and fauna of a mysterious body of land known as the Americas." That exhibit has now made it

By | October 23, 2007

In May, Bill Sharfman linkurl:wrote about;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53253/ a London exhibit of works by John White, a 16th-century painter and traveler. They are of what might be considered well-known items: A pineapple, a plantain, and a Portuguese Man O' War. As Sharfman pointed out, however, "when White painted these images in 1585, they represented England's first glimpse of the flora and fauna of a mysterious body of land known as the Americas." That exhibit has now made its way back to the Americas, and will be on display at the North Carolina Museum of History, in Raleigh, through January 13, 2008. For more on the exhibit, click linkurl:here. ;http://ncmuseumofhistory.org/lostcolony/site/index.html And if you can't make it to North Carolina before January, see a slideshow of images Sharfman put together linkurl:here. ;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53253/
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