Best Places to Work in Academia, 2007

Best Places to Work in Academia, 2007 Image Courtesy of Andre Az For the first time since 2004, peer relations were ranked more important than tenure. Find out what your peers are saying about this year's best places.By Edyta Zielinska Related Articles 1 This year, for the first time since the survey's inception in 1993, Belgium was ranked the best country in which to do research. The country rebounded following a downward trend (from fourt

By | November 1, 2007

Best Places to Work in Academia, 2007


Image Courtesy of Andre Az

For the first time since 2004, peer relations were ranked more important than tenure. Find out what your peers are saying about this year's best places.
By Edyta Zielinska

Related Articles

1

This year, for the first time since the survey's inception in 1993, Belgium was ranked the best country in which to do research. The country rebounded following a downward trend (from fourth to sixth place) from 2004 to 2006. India, a relative newcomer in the category of best country to work, beat research heavyweights such as the United Kingdom and Sweden for the second year in a row. Read more about Brazil and Mexico, two new countries on The Scientist's list of best countries to work in


Survey Methodology

The Scientist posted a Web-based questionnaire and invited readers of The Scientist and registrants on The Scientist web site who identified themselves as tenured or tenure-track life scientists working in academia or other non-commercial research organizations to respond. We received 2,072 usable responses. We asked respondents to assess their working conditions and environments by indicating their level of agreement with 39 criteria in 8 different areas. They also indicated which factors were important to them. We ranked 83 institutions - 65 from the US and 18 from the rest of the world.

To calculate an institution's overall ranking, we first weighted each factor based on the average importance score. Because several factors that ranked as important in the United States are valued less elsewhere and vice versa, we used different factor weightings to rank US and non-US institutions. The overall rankings are based on the average score per institution from all respondents on all factors weighted according to their regional importance. Detailed information on the survey methodology is available References

1. E.P. Johnson, "The reckoning of restrictions and research." The Scientist, 17(7):55-6, April 7, 2003.

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Studies Retracted After UCLA Investigation
  4. Trump Nominates Sam Clovis to Lead USDA Research
AAAS