NJ nixes stem cell research

New Jersey voters nixed Governor Jon Corzine's proposal to borrow $450 million over 10 years to fund linkurl:stem cell research;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/home/53836/ yesterday (November 6). Voters defeated the measure by a 53-47 margin. Corzine introduced the proposal in July, and supporters argued it would serve as an economic boon to the state. California, New York, and Massachusetts have already devoted extensive funds to stem cell research. According to the New York Times, t

By | November 7, 2007

New Jersey voters nixed Governor Jon Corzine's proposal to borrow $450 million over 10 years to fund linkurl:stem cell research;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/home/53836/ yesterday (November 6). Voters defeated the measure by a 53-47 margin. Corzine introduced the proposal in July, and supporters argued it would serve as an economic boon to the state. California, New York, and Massachusetts have already devoted extensive funds to stem cell research. According to the New York Times, this was the linkurl:first time in 17 years;http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/07/nyregion/07jersey.html?_r=1&oref=slogin that New Jersey voters rejected a statewide ballot question. Critics of the bill said the measure was too expensive, and opponents (including conservatives and anti-abortionists) campaigned against it.

Popular Now

  1. Decoding the Tripping Brain
  2. Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes
    The Nutshell Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes

    Analysis of the bodies of deceased individuals can’t determine what effect these tattoo remnants have on lymph function, but researchers suggest dirty needles aren’t the only risk of the age-old practice.

  3. Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?
  4. Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny
    Daily News Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny

    Out of 25,000 features originally detected by metabolic profiling of E. coli, fewer than 1,000 represent unique metabolites, a study finds.

AAAS