Uniform grant progress reports?

The NSF is looking to save researchers time and effort by creating one standard progress report form for all granting agencies. Currently each agency has its own interim report form. While agencies like the EPA or the NIH use different language to ask about scientific progress, they generally collect very similar information. The government estimates the new form will take scientists anywhere from 5 to 16 hours to complete, depending on the research project. One rationale for using a single onl

By | November 14, 2007

The NSF is looking to save researchers time and effort by creating one standard progress report form for all granting agencies. Currently each agency has its own interim report form. While agencies like the EPA or the NIH use different language to ask about scientific progress, they generally collect very similar information. The government estimates the new form will take scientists anywhere from 5 to 16 hours to complete, depending on the research project. One rationale for using a single online form is to reduce administrative costs for institutions, according to a notice in the linkurl:Federal Register,;http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/01jan20071800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2007/07-5601.htm published November 9th. This action is part of a government-wide plan to streamline the grant process, according to linkurl:The Chronicle of Higher Education.;http://chronicle.com/news/article/3411/government-weighs-common-form-for-research-progress-reports A standard form would also enable the government to make a comparison of scientists' progress across agencies. Individual agencies will be able to add a section that is specific to their program, but agencies are encouraged to keep these additional sections short. The sections will allow these agencies to ask specific question on things like environmental impact (EPA) or clinical trial awards (NIH). The government wants your opinion on the new standard progress report form. You can find more details, contact information (to whom you'd submit your comments), and an example of the draft progress report form linkurl:here.;http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/rppr/index.jsp. Comments are due by January 8, 2008.

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