Advertisement
Salesforce
Salesforce

U Wash HIV researcher faked data

A former University of Washington researcher has lost a lawsuit against the __Seattle Times__ over the disclosure of a report detailing his research misconduct. Scott Brodie, who studied linkurl:HIV;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/9/1/40/1/ and herpes, sued the university and the newspaper to prevent the report from becoming public, but a judge decided in the newspaper's favor last week, the __Times__ linkurl:reported;http://tinyurl.com/2ahaka Wednesday (November 28). According to the newspap

By | November 29, 2007

A former University of Washington researcher has lost a lawsuit against the __Seattle Times__ over the disclosure of a report detailing his research misconduct. Scott Brodie, who studied linkurl:HIV;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/9/1/40/1/ and herpes, sued the university and the newspaper to prevent the report from becoming public, but a judge decided in the newspaper's favor last week, the __Times__ linkurl:reported;http://tinyurl.com/2ahaka Wednesday (November 28). According to the newspaper, the university banned Brodie from working there after it investigated his work and discovered 15 instances of fabricated data. While at the University of Washington, Brodie published papers on linkurl:cytotoxic T cells,;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/21241 including a linkurl:1999 paper;http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v5/n1/index.html in __Nature Medicine__ that has been cited 194 times, according to the Thomson ISI database. Brodie left the university in 2003, and according to the __Times__, the federal government is investigating the case currently. A hat tip to the linkurl:news blog;http://tinyurl.com/ytk7a2 at the __Chronicle of Higher Education__ for picking up on this story.

Comments

November 30, 2007

Just to clarify that the inquiry didn't conclude that the data published in Nature Medicine were fraudulent. Instead, the problem seems to be that Dr. Brodie used a Nature Medicine figure in a subsequent research grant, identifying it as something else. In other words, as far as I know, there's not allegation that the Nature Medicine paper is fraudulent. \n\nThis is important to note because it seems that data published by Dr. Brodie in two other journals were presented to those journals as something else, raising questions about the validity of those papers.\n\nJuan Carlos Lopez\nChief Editor\nNature Medicine
Avatar of: George

George

Posts: 2

December 4, 2007

Brodie left the UW after 6 months when this started. In the end they RECOMMENDED for him to never (return) to work at the UW. The other person at another University for the same misconduct charge was found to have done NO misonduct. This is a total railroad news piece by the Seattle Times. Seems they didn't get much for spending legal money for this story. Should do your own investigating but then I guess it is easier to copy and paste. Read the 700 pages. Or contact Debbie Parish his attorney of record and a former NIH attorney (she has a web site).\n\nThink about it the University of Washington spent 16 months pouring through all of Brodie's info. for his 8yrs of work in a multi-access lab and the UW did have not one paper retracted and did not give back one grant? Why? Because there was NO misconduct. The UW was Read Research Misconduct at the ORI.hhs.gov site. Institutions are supposed to spend 60 days for inquiry and 120 to investigate NOT 16 MONTHS.\n\nHow many people worked in the lab? Answer: A lot. For years the UW never provided proper storage space or good computers for research. I saw research slides stuffed under lab tech work benches and in the cleaning closets. 3 independent labs work in a small space with no IT person to help. They all (lab people) worked to fix stuff when computers crashed or did not have enough storage on computers.\n\nCheck out the "investigators" they were anybody Karin Nyrop Asst. AG for the UW she could get to tell the UW's story. Find out there names. The Ligget investigator guy (check his background)...he always had a personal beef. He enjoyed participating in the railroad job and the Times gave him even more glory by printing his words.\n\nThe ORI will find misconduct with the UW and exonerate Brodie. Ask Debbie Parish why the ORI has not even started to look into this case.\n\nIf anybody is outright guilty of misconduct it is the University of Washington. \n\nThey put Elizabeth Loftus through the same process and took 21 Months. She stayed and fought the battle till the end and even though the UW gave in and stated no misconduct the damage was done she had to leave and start over in So. Calif.\n\nORI Misconduct Cases Highest Since 1996;\nOffice Speeding Case Closures, Official Says \n\nJohn E. Dahlberg, director of the division of investigative oversight at ORI, confirmed the statistics and told BNA March 13 that since taking over the division last May, he and his staff have tried to channel more of their focus on bringing cases to closure, while at the same time working more aggressively with ORI attorneys to get the misconduct cases handled. \n\nORI opened 230 cases last year, which Dahlberg said is consistent with the case load of previous years. However, he said ORI sees a "very small tip of the iceberg" in terms of the actual research misconduct that is happening, which he described as "reasonably widespread." He cited estimates from scientific journals that indicate about 1 percent of all their accepted manuscripts apparently have fraudulent figures. \n\n"If you do any kind of extrapolation, that could translate into lots and lots of cases," Dahlberg said. \n

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Eppendorf
Eppendorf
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Life Technologies