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Pluripotency without tumors?

Japanese researchers who linkurl:reprogrammed;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53873/ pluripotency into adult human skin cells say they have improved the technique, according to a linkurl:paper;http://www.nature.com/nbt published online today (Nov. 30) in Nature Biotechnology. linkurl:Shinya Yamanaka;http://www.frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/rc02/kyojuE.html of Kyoto University and his colleagues originally used four transcription factors to induce pluripotency in linkurl:mouse;http://www.the

By | November 30, 2007

Japanese researchers who linkurl:reprogrammed;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53873/ pluripotency into adult human skin cells say they have improved the technique, according to a linkurl:paper;http://www.nature.com/nbt published online today (Nov. 30) in Nature Biotechnology. linkurl:Shinya Yamanaka;http://www.frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/rc02/kyojuE.html of Kyoto University and his colleagues originally used four transcription factors to induce pluripotency in linkurl:mouse;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/24307/ embryonic and adult fibroblast cells, and most recently, linkurl:adult human skin cells.;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=18035408&ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum But the process caused tumors in a significant percentage of the chimeric mice generated from the cells - a problem the researchers attributed to one of the four genes, c-Myc, which induces proliferation. In the current study, the researchers showed that pluripotent cells can be made from both mouse and human adult cells without introducing the c-Myc gene, by transducing just the other three. It's not that Myc isn't needed in the process, the authors noted in the paper; rather, they suggest that the other three genes may be spurring endogenous Myc activity. None of the 26 chimeras made from cells generated without c-Myc developed tumors within 100 days, compared to six out of 36 chimeras made from cells using all four genes. linkurl:James Thomson's;http://ink.primate.wisc.edu/~thomson/ group at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, also linkurl:reported;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=18029452&ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum reprogramming human cells last week, using a set of four transcription factors that did not include c-Myc. So far, though, they have used their approach in neonatal cells, but not adult cells. The Yamanaka group's study "suggests that tumour formation was indeed due to abnormal cMyc expression rather than some general problem of the reprogramming method," linkurl:Robin Lovell-Badge;http://www.nimr.mrc.ac.uk/devgen/lovell/ of the MRC National Institute for Medical Research in London, wrote in an Email to The Scientist. "However, they did not look thoroughly for tumours and screened relatively few animals, so more work is needed on this." So far, too, efficiency with this triple-gene method is much lower than with the original four genes; half of the experiments without c-Myc did not produce pluripotent cells at all, while experiments using the four genes almost always yielded pluripotent colonies. "Does this mean that it now only works with a rare cell type?" Lovell-Badge wrote. "As always, many more questions are posed than answered."
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Avatar of: Sergio Stagnaro

Sergio Stagnaro

Posts: 59

December 5, 2007

In my opinion, such as study, according to which "As always, many more questions are posed than answered", is really intriguing, since it let's hope that also in a part of humans could be a defence natural conditio protecting against tumors. I mean to state that we are allowed to think that world population is divided by means of a singular demarcation line, as regards oncogenesis: on the one side, those individuals with cancer predisposition, different in severity; on the other side, the majority of subjects with a normally functioning psycho-neuro-endocrine-immunological system, i.e., not involved by the INHERITED disorder, termed as Oncological Terraqin (Ask to Google.com).

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