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Stem cells for Duchenne?

Adult stem cells taken from humans suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy can be genetically modified and used to treat the disease in a mouse model, researchers linkurl:report;http://www.cellstemcell.com/ today in Cell Stem Cell. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive condition caused by a mutation on the X chromosome that leads to a lack of dystrophin protein in muscle. The mutation is usually caused by a deletion or mutation in the gene, leading to a shift in the reading frame of m

By | December 12, 2007

Adult stem cells taken from humans suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy can be genetically modified and used to treat the disease in a mouse model, researchers linkurl:report;http://www.cellstemcell.com/ today in Cell Stem Cell. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive condition caused by a mutation on the X chromosome that leads to a lack of dystrophin protein in muscle. The mutation is usually caused by a deletion or mutation in the gene, leading to a shift in the reading frame of mRNA translation. In past studies, injecting Duchenne mice with normal muscle cells has temporarily staved off disease symptoms, but that technique does not work reliably and can cause immune rejection. So researchers have linkurl:proposed;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=PubMed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=16691118&ordinalpos=3&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum delivering muscle progenitor cells instead. Yvan Torrente of the University of Milan, Italy, and colleagues took human blood- and muscle-derived stem cells from Duchenne patients. They used linkurl:antisense oligonucleotides;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/21438/ delivered by linkurl:lentiviral vectors;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/19298/ to mask the incorrect mRNA splicing sites, thus returning translation to its normal reading frame. They then intramuscularly injected the corrected cells into the sick mice. Within three weeks, the transplanted cells gave rise to muscle fibers and spurred production of the dystrophin protein. The authors caution, however, that using viral vectors may cause tumor formation, and that details of the technique such as its efficiency remain to be worked out. Both the antisense techniques and muscle cell transplantation have been tried before in Duchenne, note linkurl:Kay Davis;http://www.hertford.ox.ac.uk/main/content/view/155/249/ of Oxford University and linkurl:Miranda Grounds;http://school.anhb.uwa.edu.au/personalpages/grounds/ of the University of Western Australia in an accompanying review article. But the combination of the two makes this a proof of principle study that shows that "steady progress is being made toward the goal of stem cell-mediated restoration of dystrophin expression," they write.
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Avatar of: Sergio Stagnaro

Sergio Stagnaro

Posts: 59

December 13, 2007

Not only in treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy, but also in all other cases, as I wrote in Washington Post website (Google.com), we have to be more cautious than we have been unfortunately untill now. I mean that - before using stem cells - we must know perfectly all biophysical-semeiotic Constitutions of such as cells (See www.semeioticabiofisica.it and particularly Stagnaro S., Stagnaro-Neri M., Le Costituzioni Semeiotico-Biofisiche.Strumento clinico fondamentale per la prevenzione primaria e la definizione della Single Patient Based Medicine. Travel Factory, Roma, 2004. http://www.travelfactory.it). Otherwise, unfavorable side-effects,e.g., osteoporosis, leukaemia, and cancer, may occur...and OCCUR!

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