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Hwang back to research?

Hwang Woo-Suk, the disgraced South Korean stem cell scientist, is part of a research team in South Korea requesting permission to work on human embryonic stem cells, the Associated Press linkurl:reported;http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/12/17/asia/AS-GEN-SKorea-Hwang-Stem-Cell.php yesterday. Hwang was one of eight researchers from the Suam Biotechnology Institute, a lab he linkurl:founded;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23737/ last year, who filed the request, an anonymous official

By | December 18, 2007

Hwang Woo-Suk, the disgraced South Korean stem cell scientist, is part of a research team in South Korea requesting permission to work on human embryonic stem cells, the Associated Press linkurl:reported;http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/12/17/asia/AS-GEN-SKorea-Hwang-Stem-Cell.php yesterday. Hwang was one of eight researchers from the Suam Biotechnology Institute, a lab he linkurl:founded;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23737/ last year, who filed the request, an anonymous official at the South Korean Health Ministry's bioethics and safety bureau told the linkurl:Agence France-Presse.;http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=071217172731.jr1c7zwb&show_article=1 Jung Tae-gil, an official at the Ministry, told the AP that the Ministry will decide by April 2008 whether to approve the request. Hwang is still on trial for linkurl:fabricating;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/22933/ data on his work on human cloning. He linkurl:left his post;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/22843/ at Seoul National University in 2005 following accusations of misconduct.
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