Congress passes NIH budget

Both chambers of Congress this afternoon (December 19) agreed to a suite of government spending bills that included roughly $29 billion for the National Institutes of Health, according to Nancy Granese from the Campaign for Medical Research. This budget, for FY08, is $130 million more than FY07. The linkurl:raise;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54025 was smaller than some medical and research organizations had hoped for. In a press release from CMR, the group's chairman, G. Steven Bur

By | December 19, 2007

Both chambers of Congress this afternoon (December 19) agreed to a suite of government spending bills that included roughly $29 billion for the National Institutes of Health, according to Nancy Granese from the Campaign for Medical Research. This budget, for FY08, is $130 million more than FY07. The linkurl:raise;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54025 was smaller than some medical and research organizations had hoped for. In a press release from CMR, the group's chairman, G. Steven Burrill, said: "we remain deeply concerned that Federal investment in the NIH has failed to keep pace with inflation for five straight years." That sentiment was echoed in a statement by the American Association of Medical Colleges. The bill now moves to the president for his approval.

Popular Now

  1. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  2. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  3. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  4. ESP on Trial
    Foundations ESP on Trial

    In the 1930s, parapsychologist Joseph Banks Rhine aimed to use scientific methods to confirm the existence of extrasensory perception, but faced criticisms of dubious analyses and irreproducible results.

RayBiotech