Blakemore denied Sir - again

In case you missed this over the holiday, former Medical Research Council head Colin Blakemore was denied knighthood by the UK, where news reports have attributed the decision to his support of animal research. In 2003, Blakemore was also linkurl:denied knighthood;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/21915/ for a similar reason. The snub smarts, especially since the chief of the MRC would normally automatically be granted a knighthood. That year, Blakemore threatened to resign as MRC he

By | January 2, 2008

In case you missed this over the holiday, former Medical Research Council head Colin Blakemore was denied knighthood by the UK, where news reports have attributed the decision to his support of animal research. In 2003, Blakemore was also linkurl:denied knighthood;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/21915/ for a similar reason. The snub smarts, especially since the chief of the MRC would normally automatically be granted a knighthood. That year, Blakemore threatened to resign as MRC head, but linkurl:stayed until last year;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53663/ after Prime Minister Tony Blair linkurl:issued a letter;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/21930/ in support of animal research. Many scientists have criticized the decision. Chris Higgins, vice-chancellor of Durham University, linkurl:told;http://news.independent.co.uk/sci_tech/article3289238.ece the Independent that Blakemore deserved the honor. "Irrespective of his role as head of the MRC, I'd have expected him to be honored for his really critical role in promoting the need for animal research in biomedicine," Higgins said. For a list of scientists who did make it to knighthood this year, including Ian Wilmut, cloner of Dolly the sheep, you can read a Guardian linkurl:article;http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/news/story/0,,2232877,00.html?gusrc=rss&feed=8 here.

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