Stem cell trial death

A nine-year-old girl enrolled in a stem cell therapy trial has died, according to the company running the trial, StemCells, Inc. An independent committee ruled that the death was not caused by the stem cell treatment. The girl was one of six children being treated for a neurodegenerative disorder -- called Batten Disease -- with transplants of linkurl:neural stem cells;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54169/ derived from fetal tissue. Nature's stem cell blog linkurl:The Niche;http:

By | January 22, 2008

A nine-year-old girl enrolled in a stem cell therapy trial has died, according to the company running the trial, StemCells, Inc. An independent committee ruled that the death was not caused by the stem cell treatment. The girl was one of six children being treated for a neurodegenerative disorder -- called Batten Disease -- with transplants of linkurl:neural stem cells;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54169/ derived from fetal tissue. Nature's stem cell blog linkurl:The Niche;http://blogs.nature.com/reports/theniche/2008/01/girl_dies_in_stem_cell_trial_f_1.html, reported the death on Sunday (January 20). According to a company linkurl:press release;http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/080118/20080118005145.html?.v=1 the girl had been admitted to the hospital two weeks ago with seizures, viral infection, and respiratory distress. The principle investigators at Oregon Health and Science University, who were running the trial, also said that the death was not caused by the stem cell treatment, but by the disease. The trial is continuing, and is one of many linkurl:ongoing trials;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/54071/ using linkurl:stem cell therapy.;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/24104/

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS