Double vision in biomedicine

A significant portion of biomedical research papers contain plagiarism, according to linkurl:a report;http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080123/full/news.2008.520.html in this week's Nature. Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center used a new text-search program to linkurl:scan papers;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53503/ and now estimate that the 17 million articles on Medline may contain 200,000 duplicates. One of the nabbed authors is a "big shot" at "

By | January 24, 2008

A significant portion of biomedical research papers contain plagiarism, according to linkurl:a report;http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080123/full/news.2008.520.html in this week's Nature. Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center used a new text-search program to linkurl:scan papers;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53503/ and now estimate that the 17 million articles on Medline may contain 200,000 duplicates. One of the nabbed authors is a "big shot" at "one of the most prestigious universities in the United States" who is now being investigated by a journal for plagiarism, author Mounir Errami linkurl:told;http://chronicle.com/subscribe/login?url=http%3A%2F%2Fchronicle.com%2Fdaily%2F2008%2F01%2F1362n.htm the Chronicle of Higher Education. He and his colleagues have placed 70,000 abstracts they flagged as possible duplicates in a public database linkurl:Deja vu;http:/spore.swmed.edu/dejavu for the community to review.

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