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Help wanted: Science advisors

Who should the next US president appoint as director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy? That and more than 50 other science-related linkurl:positions;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53457/ in the executive branch will more than likely be up for grabs come next January. The scientific community has already called for a linkurl:science debate;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54084/ by presidential candidates. But policy experts at this weekend's meeting of the Ame

By | February 19, 2008

Who should the next US president appoint as director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy? That and more than 50 other science-related linkurl:positions;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53457/ in the executive branch will more than likely be up for grabs come next January. The scientific community has already called for a linkurl:science debate;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54084/ by presidential candidates. But policy experts at this weekend's meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston told scientists to stop complaining about governmental slights to science, and start coming up with a list of what the influential science policy positions might be, Nature linkurl:reports.;http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080219/full/451875a.html So, who should fill these positions? Tell us in a comment to this blog.
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Comments

Avatar of: Edward Litvin

Edward Litvin

Posts: 2

February 20, 2008

People:\nThe next president should pick an earth scientist as science advisor. Most if not all geologists have studied some biology, chemistry, and physics and are comfortable integrating these fields into their work. Most are aware of the facts surrounding resource depletion and climate change. They are naturally inclined to take the long term perspective while competently dealing with the here and now. I think I've made my case.
Avatar of: Peter Jorgensen

Peter Jorgensen

Posts: 2

February 20, 2008

While I certainly understand the logic behind having an earth scientist be the President's science adviser I would recommend filling that role with an information scientist. We are, after all, living in what many call the "Information Age." Every type of activity, be it commercial, social, governmental or creative is now largely dependent on the effective handling of information... or "Informatics." Information Scientists are also generalists and are especially adept at bridging disciplines and facilitating information discovery and sharing.\n\nP Jorgensen, Member - ASIST, ACM, ALISE, CPFSR
Avatar of: Devon VanCuren

Devon VanCuren

Posts: 2

February 23, 2008

As a government employee, I know that all of our jobs have a duty description. What is the duty description of the science advisor to the President? Knowing the requirements would help pick one. I want one that is well rounded, is respected in whatever field he/she may have worked in, has the ability to commnicate effectively, and actually believes in science vs. the "other".

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