James Watson supports Obama

In an intriguing election-year twist, James Watson, the linkurl:renowned biologist;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/36882/ who made headlines last October when he told the linkurl:__Sunday Times__;http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article2677098.ece that people of African descent were linkurl:less intelligent;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53712/ than white people, has supported a person of African descent for President of the United States, according to the website

By | February 22, 2008

In an intriguing election-year twist, James Watson, the linkurl:renowned biologist;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/36882/ who made headlines last October when he told the linkurl:__Sunday Times__;http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article2677098.ece that people of African descent were linkurl:less intelligent;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53712/ than white people, has supported a person of African descent for President of the United States, according to the website linkurl:opensecrets.org.;http://www.opensecrets.org/ Watson linkurl:contributed;http://www.opensecrets.org/indivs/search_hp.asp?txtName=watson&NumOfThou=0&txt2008=Y&submit=Go%21 $2,300 to the Barack Obama campaign this January. Other prominent scientists making contributions in what is shaping up to be a highly charged election year include Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center president Harold Varmus (who has donated to the Obama, Richardson, and Clinton presidential campaigns in the past year) and genomics pioneer and __The Scientist__ editorial board member Craig Venter (who donated $2,300 to the Clinton campaign last year, but most recently donated $1,000 to the Obama campaign).

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