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Online methods videos go mainstream

Scientific and medical publisher Wiley-Blackwell announced this week (February 20) that they will work with the linkurl:Journal of Visualized Experiments;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/37167/ (JoVE), the first online video methods journal, to add methods videos to the journal linkurl:Current Protocols.;http://www.currentprotocols.com/WileyCDA/ Rumors of JoVE's deal with Wiley-Blackwell and other mainstream science publishers have been circulating in the blogosphere since late January

By | February 22, 2008

Scientific and medical publisher Wiley-Blackwell announced this week (February 20) that they will work with the linkurl:Journal of Visualized Experiments;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/37167/ (JoVE), the first online video methods journal, to add methods videos to the journal linkurl:Current Protocols.;http://www.currentprotocols.com/WileyCDA/ Rumors of JoVE's deal with Wiley-Blackwell and other mainstream science publishers have been circulating in the blogosphere since late January. Moshe Pritsker, CEO of JoVE, told The Scientist this week that he had also signed similar deals with Annual Reviews and linkurl:Springer Protocols.;http://springerprotocols.com/cdp/access/showVideos JoVE has about 200 methods videos on its Web site; the Wiley-Blackwell deal plans for another 200 in the coming year. According to Pritsker, the company has a network of video teams on the ready in cities in the US, Canada and Japan who can film and edit the video. Because the videos require intensive editing (10 or 15 minutes of video from, say, a three to four hour experiment) and technical expertise, they're expensive to produce, he said, though he refused to give an estimate of the cost. (Last summer, for a linkurl:news story;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53500/ in The Scientist on video imaging, Pritsker estimated the cost of making a video at a few hundred dollars, but that's no longer the case: "As the professional level of our videos increased, our production expenses increased too," he wrote in an Email to me yesterday.) "Our idea is to become the video platform of the biological sciences," Pritsker said.
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Comments

Avatar of: TOVE SANDBERG

TOVE SANDBERG

Posts: 1

February 25, 2008

To make methods videos give the students training in laboratory methods during education to biomedical scientists for example, is an excellent complement for laboratory training.I have tried this myself with a group of students who should learn about cell cultivation.I made three instruction video films, one by trypsination cells, one by freezing cells, and one by thawing cells. I instructed the students to look at the videos before they should enter the laboratory room. The questions they got to evaluate was connected to if the videos did help them to practice the laboratory lesson in an easier way, than just having instructions from me.\nThe evaluation did result in an overwhelmed positive reaction, because they could look at the videos not only before the laboratory moment, but also after they have finished, to repeat the instruction for themselves. They all found that they learned and remembered more through looking at the videos. They managed to do the different laboratory moments much easier, than just being instructed in the "physical room".\nI think it´s a very good idea to make videos over laboratory methods and to use them in the education situations, both at University and also for self instructions concerning the research people who must learn new methods to fullfill their research, when there is no one to instruct them.\nTove Sandberg PhD, senior lecturer\nMalmö University, Health and Society
Avatar of: Wang xiaofeng

Wang xiaofeng

Posts: 1

February 26, 2008

This is the impact and advacement of web2.0...
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