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Teen's cancer study wins Intel prize

A 17-year-old high school student from North Carolina has won the 2008 linkurl:Intel Science Talent Search;http://www.intel.com/education/sts/index.htm for developing a genetic method that predicts the likelihood of relapse in early-stage colon cancer patients. Intel linkurl:awarded;http://www.intel.com/education/sts/2008winners.htm Shivani Sud a $100,000 college scholarship for her work in labs at Temple University and the National Cancer Institute. Sud has been pursuing her interest in cancer

By | March 13, 2008

A 17-year-old high school student from North Carolina has won the 2008 linkurl:Intel Science Talent Search;http://www.intel.com/education/sts/index.htm for developing a genetic method that predicts the likelihood of relapse in early-stage colon cancer patients. Intel linkurl:awarded;http://www.intel.com/education/sts/2008winners.htm Shivani Sud a $100,000 college scholarship for her work in labs at Temple University and the National Cancer Institute. Sud has been pursuing her interest in cancer research since her early teens; when __The Scientist__ linkurl:profiled;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/25137/ her in 2006, she had already worked on projects developing new cancer drug delivery vectors and studying the downregulation of proteins involved with apoptosis. Sud's prize-winning "50-gene model," which uses gene expression to molecularly characterize colon tumor types, improves upon current visual tumor identification methods and could one day be used to tailor drug treatments to individual patients based on the state of their tumors.
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Avatar of: anonymous poster

anonymous poster

Posts: 4

March 13, 2008

This 17 year old girl actually gave me a glimpse of hope that the next generation is not all a bunch of electronic age punks texting in a broken english (with their underwear hanging out). Some kids are actually passionate about a subject enough to advance science. Her story is quite interesting. As a child she had a close relative diagnosed with colon cancer, and it inspired her to the accomplish many great acheivements.
Avatar of: anonymous poster

anonymous poster

Posts: 29

March 14, 2008

"Our youth now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for\nauthority; they show disrespect for their elders, and love chatter in\nplaces of exercise. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. \nThey contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up their\nfood and tyrannize their teachers."\n\nSocrates, 5th century B.C.

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