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Hybrid embryos challenged

Two Christian groups launched legal action today (Apr. 9) challenging licenses granted to UK scientists to create human-animal hybrid embryos for research purposes, according to the linkurl:The Press Association.;http://ukpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5in0LcrQJp4_o18yGsYuhTXWyasiQ In January, the linkurl:Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53564/ (HFEA), Britain's oversight body for stem cell research, awarded licenses to research groups at New

By | April 9, 2008

Two Christian groups launched legal action today (Apr. 9) challenging licenses granted to UK scientists to create human-animal hybrid embryos for research purposes, according to the linkurl:The Press Association.;http://ukpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5in0LcrQJp4_o18yGsYuhTXWyasiQ In January, the linkurl:Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53564/ (HFEA), Britain's oversight body for stem cell research, awarded licenses to research groups at Newcastle University and King's College London to create hybrid embryos. The Christian Legal Centre (CLC) and Comment on Reproductive Ethics (CORE) have now instigated a judicial review of the licenses, arguing that the HFEA acted illegally because the existing legislation, dating back to 1990, does not allow licensing of hybrid embryos. The legal battle comes a month ahead of the government's linkurl:vote next month;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54519 on the controversial Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill. Last week, it linkurl:emerged;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54487/ that the Newcastle group had already created cytoplasmic hybrids using human DNA and empty cow eggs, though the work has not yet been published or peer-reviewed.
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