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Conflicts on HHS stem cell council

Nearly half the voting members of a Department of Health and Human Services linkurl:stem cell;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/54071/ advisory council have financial conflicts of interest despite the committee's pledge to limit these types of conflicts, according to a linkurl:survey;http://www.cspinet.org/integrity/watch/200804281.html#1 conducted by a science watchdog group. The Center for Science in the Public Interest polled the 25 voting members of HHS's linkurl:Advisory Council

By | April 28, 2008

Nearly half the voting members of a Department of Health and Human Services linkurl:stem cell;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/54071/ advisory council have financial conflicts of interest despite the committee's pledge to limit these types of conflicts, according to a linkurl:survey;http://www.cspinet.org/integrity/watch/200804281.html#1 conducted by a science watchdog group. The Center for Science in the Public Interest polled the 25 voting members of HHS's linkurl:Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation;http://bloodcell.transplant.hrsa.gov/ABOUT/Advisory_Council/index.html (ACBSCT) and found that 11 reported having financial ties to stem cell and linkurl:umbilical cord blood;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/03/01/s62/1/ banking companies, drug makers, and the linkurl:transplantation;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/17367/ industry. For example, linkurl:Frederick Appelbaum,;http://myprofile.cos.com/APPELBAUM who is the head of medical oncology at the University of Washington, has relationships with Merck, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Wyeth, and Genzyme. Another council member, linkurl:Richard Champlin,;http://www.mdanderson.org/departments/bmt/display.cfm?id=627c8063-8efd-11d4-80fa00508b603a14&method=displayfull&pn=d1766775-8e4c-11d4-80fa00508b603a14 is the chairman of the University of Texas in Houston's Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Department, but also serves on the medical advisory board of linkurl:Stemcyte,;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/15348/ an international company that runs cord blood banking programs. According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, the HHS official in charge of the ACBSCT said that none of the initial applicants to the council (of which there were over 100) were screened for conflicts of interest even though the council's linkurl:charter;http://bloodcell.transplant.hrsa.gov/ABOUT/Advisory_Council/Charter/index.html clearly states that, "Any member of the Council who has an employment, governance, or financial affiliation with a donor center, recruitment organization, transplant center, or cord blood bank will be prohibited from participating in any decision that materially affects the donor center, recruitment organization, transplant center, or cord blood bank. The number of members with such affiliations on the Council shall be limited." The ACBSCT was formed in 2006 to advise HHS policy makers on cord blood donation and stem cell transplantation science and met for the first time this past January. The council is meeting today and tomorrow (Apr 28 and 29) in Rockville, Maryland to discuss cord blood donor recruitment practices, blood bank accreditation, and linkurl:stem cell transplantation;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/daily/24908/ practices.
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Avatar of: charles green

charles green

Posts: 1

April 29, 2008

11 of 25 who's interest is it anyway? \nThe Public? The Fox? Houston we have a PROBLEM!\n\n Who's paying attention to what condition our condition is in?\nIt was Albert E. who said; Unthinking acceptance of authority is the enemy of truth.\n\nLet?s get to the truth, about who's interest comes first, we need a "save the hens oversight foundation".\n
Avatar of: Gordon Couger

Gordon Couger

Posts: 23

April 29, 2008

As there is less and less government funding for research of all kinds but particularly stem cells. The money must come from some where. So more and more conflicts of interest are bound to come about.\n\nTo stop that all that is needed is to step up and fund research as we used to do instead of spending less and less every year.\n\nIt is simply part of the price of progress without government funds.\n\nGordon Couger\nStillwater, OK
Avatar of: Alice Doosey

Alice Doosey

Posts: 1

April 30, 2008

Indeed, it seems as if HHS is out of it's element with this one Donny.

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